Coddle Your Eggs

This weekend I found an estate sale around the corner from me. It was next door actually to one I had been to a few months back. I love going through those old houses; they have some really cool bones. This one had some unique features, too. There was a nice built in cabinet with sliding doors in the pantry. There wasn’t much left by the time I got there but there were some nice pieces. I found this neat covered aluminum buffet dish with a Pyrex divided dish inside.

 

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BW Buenilum & Pyrex Covered Dish Found at Estate Sale

Also hidden in that sweet little cabinet were these egg coddlers. I have a set like them of my own except mine are Royal Worcester. I got these to sell at the Vintage Eve’s shop. They are Wedgwood and have the Wild Strawberry pattern on them from the mid-1960s. Aren’t they pretty! And useful!

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Wedgwood Egg Coddlers (Available at Vintage Eve’s)

I like stuff that is useful and these are very useful. Egg Coddlers, near as anyone can tell were invented sometime around the end of the 1800s. The first time anyone seems to have seen these is when they were produced by Grainger China Works in the 1880s for Royal Worcester (Museum of Royal Worcester).

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1930s Egg Coddler by Bauhaus Designer Wilhem Wagenfeld (available at Room 606)

Apparently, the first ones were made of earthenware and fired at a very high temperature. They had a flat cover, without the lifting ring that we are used to seeing on the coddlers and were plain white or simply decorated.

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Set of 5 Early Victorian Egg Coddlers by Syracuse China (photo courtesy of Nick Haus Vintage Antiques)

According to the Museum of Royal Worcester, from about 1910 to 1928 these were listed in the Royal Worcester factory ledgers as “Premier Egg Cups.” They have a patent number of 561564. Their two most popular patterns were Worcester Willow and Pekin.

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Adorable Egg Coddler circa 1960s (available at Lynnie McGoogins)

On the Museum of Royal Worcester website there is a useful list of marks to help date the Royal Worcester coddlers. Wedgwood coddlers have a different look than the Royal Worcester line. They have a smaller pedestal than the Royal Worcester and they have a more convex shape. Egg-Coddlers.com says that Wedgwood coddlers have a very distinctive lip that sticks out a few millimeters from the body. You can see that lip below.

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Wedgwood Beatrix Potter Double-Egg Egg Coddlers (available at Gidget’s Vintage Finds)

The rings on the Wedgwoods are different, too. They have a thicker, flat piece of metal on the top where the Royal Worcester coddlers have more of a thin lifter ring. The Wedgwood ones also come in two sizes known as single and double. The double is 4 1/2″ tall and 2 7/8″ in diameter (Egg-Coddlers.com).

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Royal Worcester 1-egg and 2-egg Egg Coddlers (available at Loose Ends Vintage)

Max Roesler or Rosler was another company that made egg coddlers. Their’s were porcelain with a flat porcelain lid that screwed on.

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Vintage Egg Coddler (available at The Freckled Berry)

So what do we do with coddlers? We make coddled eggs! Butter the inside of the coddler, crack an egg into the coddler, screw on the lid and put it in water up to where the lid is screwed on. Boil it for about 5 minutes and you will have a nice soft boiled egg. You can add all kinds of things before you close the lid, bacon, cream, chives, salt, pepper and more. There’s lots of recipes out there.

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Royal Worcester Egg Coddler (available at Birdy Coconut)
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Royal Worcester Egg Coddler Instructions (available at Birdy Coconut)

Well, I hope you have learned a little about the egg coddler. They are unique little items. As always, I will be partying at the links on the right this week — take a second and check them out. Have a wonderful week!

 

 

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Coddle Your Eggs

  1. Great info, Rheta! Egg coddlers aren’t new to me, but if I ever knew how to “work” one, I forgot long ago–lol. They really can be a beautiful collectible. Thanks for sharing with us at Vintage Charm 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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