They Named It DuraPrint

The other day in my travels, I ran across a pattern I hadn’t seen before. I was familiar with Homer Laughlin china, which I’ve actually posted about before and is archived here on the Vintage Eve’s blog. I had never seen this pattern, though. It was in their DuraPrint line. Also, new to me, as I hadn’t picked up any pieces in that line before.

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12″ Oval Platter

 

So this gorgeous pattern is called Star-Brite. If you look it up on Replacements, they list it as HLC1850 (HLC=Homer Laughlin China). It is so iconically 1950s with the black and aqua color scheme, and the atomic stars! I love it. I found two serving pieces and four dinner plates which have all since been listed in the Vintage Eve’s shop on Etsy.

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Serving Bowl

DuraPrint was a rather interesting process. According to laurelhollowpark.com, DuraPrint was a design process in the 1950s where a bladder was filled with air, and the design was basically smooshed on to a piece as the bladder was inflated. The paint was forced through holes in a thin metal plate that was attached to the bladder, which then “stamped” the piece that was being decorated (Robbinsnest). I think it lead to a number of flaws, however, as the pieces I saw had some smears and missing spots. But they were not kidding about the name.

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Up Close and Personal
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Gorgeousness

Those pieces that I put in the shop are just as bright as if they were done yesterday. After the design was put on, a clear glaze went on top. Because the design was under the glaze, they stayed looking new. Interestingly, this process only worked on the flatter pieces. Sugar bowls, creamers, etc., were one solid color with no design because they were too round to work with the DuraPrint process.

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Dinner Plates

So that’s DuraPrint. I hope you enjoyed this short look at an old process. I do love old china and dishware, especially the bowls — you know I do! Have a great week everyone!

 

References:

Laurel Hollow Park. (n.d.). Charm House and Duraprint. Retrieved from http://www.laurelhollowpark.net/hlc/charmhouse.html

Robbins Nest. (n.d.). Duraprint. Retrieved from https://www.robbinsnest.com/china/homer-laughlin-china/duraprint/

 

Fiesta at the Laughlins!

If you’ve written a blog for any length of time, it is hard to keep track of all the things you’ve talked about. Luckily, I can do a search, which is what I did today to make sure I hadn’t covered what I wanted to talk about today. I was honestly surprised to realize I haven’t done a post on Homer Laughlin! It’s one of those companies that has given us some really well-known lines.

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Homer Laughlin Creamer Hotel Ware Line (available at Vintage Eve’s)

I myself have a number of Homer Laughlin pieces in my shop. The piece above and the piece below, both Homer Laughlin.

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Homer Laughlin Ferndale Nautilus Salt & Pepper Shakers (available at Vintage Eve’s)

This company is actually still in business today which is commendable considering they rode out the Great Depression, recession and other economic issues that have taken down any number of great pottery houses. They began in 1871 on the banks of the Ohio River in Liverpool, Ohio. A lot of potteries started in Ohio during the turn of twentieth century.

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Homer Laughlin Art Pottery circa 1910 (available at Wild Crockophile)

According to the Homer Laughlin website, the Laughlin Brothers, Homer and Shakespeare, wanted to make quality china at a fair price. They started out making yellow ware and stoneware. In 1873, the town of East Liverpool kicked in $5,000 (a lot of money in those days!) to build a “white ware plant which was still to be known as the Laughlin Brothers.” (Lehner, 1988, p. 245).

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Homer Laughlin Kwaker Rosewood 4 Piece Set circa 1920 (available at Lindsay Jane’s Cottage)

By 1903 they had outgrown their factory and expanded to Newell Farm in West Virginia which was just across the Ohio River. They also began the framework for what was to become the town of Newell. So definitely an important company to that area of West Virginia!

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Homer Laughlin Riviera Sugar and Creamer circa 1930 (available at Antiques by Granny)

They landed some government contracts supplying hotelware known as “double thick” in both WWI and WWII. In 1949 they started to produce hotelware full time. This includes products for the restaurant and food service business. That market is still a large part of their business today. Their Best China, a vitrified china product, puts them in the top 3 leaders in this field (Lehner, 1988, p. 245).

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Homer Laughlin Best China Dishes (available at Mud in the USA)

They continued to expand through the 1930s when in 1936 they introduced a line of china that became a huge success. Any guesses? Fiesta!! Yes Homer Laughlin is the maker of Fiesta ware. Fiesta was made in a bold range of colors with some really unique designs. Fiesta has many collectors that seek out the vintage pieces. It was discontinued in 1973 but then reintroduced in 1986. The colors are slightly different on the new pieces so it can be difficult to determine old and new but the marking will be different. Check out this section on Laurel Hollow Park on identifying them.

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Vintage Homer Laughlin Fiestaware (available at The Freckled Berry)

Interesting fact…from 1943 to 1959 the most popular Fiesta color, Fiesta Red, was not produced due to government control of the depleted uranium that went into making the color. During the 40s and 50s the color choices of Fiesta were forest green, chartreuse, grey and rose.

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Homer Laughlin Fiesta Red Pitcher (available at Molto Belle)

Apparently Fiesta Red was a complicated color to produce because when most of the original technicians who worked on producing the color retired by 1972, the new manufacturing processes could not reproduce the color and they decided, rather than make an inferior product, they would stop producing it. By 1973 all Fiesta production ceased.

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Homer Laughlin Kitchen Kraft Covered Casserole Dish (available at Blue Plate Special 2005)

There are A LOT of different backstamps identifying Homer Laughlin. Check out Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay for a comprehensive list. Some of their lines include Sunrise, Zylco, Kenmark, Royal, Priscilla, Swing and many, many more.

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Homer Laughlin Harlequin Nut Bowls (available at Coleblk)

Homer Laughlin China has innovated over the years becoming a multi-generational employer. They worked hard to introduce some green production, and actually have always produced and manufactured what they sell. I loved learning their story and sharing it with you. Hats off to one of the remaining great American potteries!

I will be partying at the blogs to the right all week, please join me if you have some time. Have a great week!

 

 

 

 

 

Hall of Fame

Hall China Company. I see so many pieces with the Hall or Hall’s mark and for good reason; they have been in business since August 14, 1903! And they are still in business! There are so few companies that have lasted that long that they deserve a little fame.

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Hall’s Superior Quality Bowl (available at Vintage Eve’s)

Hall China Company is one of those companies that came out of Ohio. They were started at East Fourth and Walnut Streets in East Liverpool, Ohio. According to one of my favorite sources, “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay” by Lois Lehner, the company was founded by Robert Hall and his son, Robert T. Hall. Unfortunately, the elder Hall died in 1904!

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Hall’s Superior Quality Decorated Teapot circa 1940s (available at Buy The Lake Vintage)

Originally the company made whiteware from 1905 to 1911. This helped get the company off the ground. Robert T. Hall wanted more for the company, though. He had an idea that proved to be the product that made the company stand out above the rest. He developed a new glaze that was “single fire, non-lead, hard, non-porous and craze proof” (Lehner, 1988, p. 187). They called this their “Secret Process.”

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Hall China Co. Hotpoint Refrigerator Pitcher circa 1930s (available at Lovettsville)

From this point in 1914, they began to grow and expand quite a lot. They got into cookware such as casseroles, teapots and coffee urn liners (for industrial uses). In 1919 they bought the Goodwin Pottery Plant to make decorated teapots. They were soon the leader in teapots. In 1920 Robert T. Hall passed away and Malcolm W. Thompson took over.

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Hall Super-Ceram Graduated Set (available at Abundancy)
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Hall Super-Ceram Mark (available at Abundancy)

They continued to grow acquiring other plants until in 1930 they abandoned all the other buildings and moved into a large facility which they added to 8 times over the years. It is the facility they still use and encompasses 12 acres!

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Hall’s China Co. Covered Casserole (available at Ric’s Relics)

As time marched on, their lines grew. There is Hall Fireproof China which covers casseroles and other baking dishes, teapots, coffee pots, serving dishes and storage dishes. Many of these pieces have been produced for the industrial/restaurant sectors. Hall’s Superior Quality, like the piece at the top of this post, was available through stamp stores and large merchandising centers.

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Hall’s Flare-Ware Teapot (available at Lilly’s Vintage Cupboard)
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Hall China Flare Ware Mark (available at Lilly’s Vintage Cupboard)

Super-Ceram is their’s, too. It’s a tough, white ceramic. There are over 100 marks associated with Hall China Co. They help to identify them as made for the railroads, airlines, restaurants and stores like Montgomery Wards, Sears and Roebuck and the Jewell Tea Company. At one point they even had a partnership with Longaberger Baskets. They are now joined with Homer Laughlin China under the HLC Inc. umbrella.

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Hall Covered Refrigerator Dish for Montgomery Ward (available at Classy Vintage Glass)
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Hall China Co. Mark for Montgomery Ward & Co. (available at Classy Vintage Glass)

As you can see, Hall China Co. knew how to stay in business. They diversified and managed to make a good product which they moved through many different venues. If you can get your hands on Lehner’s book, she has an extensive number of marks for identifying years of manufacture. I don’t receive any monetary compensation for recommending her book, it’s just a great resource.

If you have any stories of a favorite Hall China piece, leave me a comment. I love hearing from everyone! Please join me at the link parties on the right and have a great week!

 

 

 

Into the Fire

One of the more well-known items that came out the 20th century in the way of dinnerware was Fire-King. I can spot it on a shelf a mile away.

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Fire-King Custard Cups (photo courtesy of Vintage Eve’s)

Well, my eyesight’s not so hot these days so maybe a few feet away. But I know it when I see it. Fire-King is one of Anchor Hocking’s line of glassware. It comes in milky white and a number of other colors including a popular color called Jade-ite. It has a luster to it that isn’t just a gloss and it’s very collectible.

 

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Fire-King in Primrose Pattern (photo courtesy of TreasureObsessed)

 

According to Collectors Weekly, Anchor Hocking was originally Hocking Glass Corporation, named after the Hocking River in Lancaster, Ohio.

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Fire-King Jade-ite Bowl (photo courtesy of FranksCollections)

They began in 1905 and made pressed glass. They merged in 1937 with Anchor Cap and Closure Corporation of Long Island City, New York.

 

 

As they grew they expanded into other lines such as plastic and other materials so they dropped the word “glass” from their name and became Anchor Hocking in 1969.

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Fire-King Lusterware Beehive Bowl (photo courtesy of FoundGoodsCA)

Fire-King began its manufacture from around 1940 until 1976. Collectors Weekly says that “Fire-King was a brand not a pattern…” and had many different items in the line. There was dinnerware, mugs, bowls and other items.

There were patterns, too such as Alice that was created in the late 1940s, Jane Ray, Hobnail, Early American Prescut and Rainbow. Rainbow was to be a competitor for the popular Fiestaware that was being produced by the Homer Laughlin Company starting in 1936.

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Fire-King Philbe Custard Dishes (photo courtesy of ArtzyBitz)

 

 

There was one pattern that was only made from 1937 to 1938 called Philbe. It was run in 4 colors but transparent blue, called Sapphire, is the most collected in this pattern. I love finding those elusive pieces.

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Fire-King McDonald’s Cup (Photo courtesy of KanesVintage)

 

Jade-ite and an opaque white called Anchorwhite were introduced as restaurant and institution ware during the time from 1948 to 1967. In 1976 Fire-King was discontinued.

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Fire-King Polka Dot (photo courtesy of EuroFair)
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Fire-King Tulip (photo courtesy of Jiminyvintage)

 

 

 

Fire-King is such a great collectible. An iconic item from the 1950s and 60s that reminds me of times gone by. Not necessarily simpler times, just different. Well, if you get a chance leave me a note or stop by Vintage Eve’s shop and take a poke around at some more vintage treasures.

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Fire-King 1 Pint Baking Dish in Sapphire Philbe Pattern (photo courtesy of Vintage Eve’s)

Enjoy your week!

Where I like to party Adirondack Girl @ Heart !