Honorable Mentionables

There’s been a number of new things added to the shop recently. As you know by now if you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, I like to find the backstories and histories on my pieces. However, now and again, there just isn’t much information on a company or a piece. That doesn’t mean that they don’t deserve a mention! So here are some honorable mentionables.

Take a look at this gorgeous copper bowl!

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Copper Bowl with Silver Wash by Peter Manzoni Boston Metalworker circa 1930
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Signature of Artist

I’ve had this beautiful copper bowl for a bit in the store, however, there is very little information about the maker. Peter Manzoni was a metal worker back in the 1920s in Boston, Massachusetts. The bowl is beautiful, shaped like a flower with a gorgeous silver wash that complements the copper and the shape. It’s small, at only about 4 1/2″ across, but it’s got style for miles. It’s signed on the bottom, and is one of his better known shapes.

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Side View of Manzoni Bowl

All I can find out about him, though, is that he was part of the Boston Arts and Crafts Movement. He was a metalworker who also contributed to a book called “Metalwork for the Amateur” in 1936. He also partnered later with Angelo Martini to form Manzoni and Martini Art Metal Company. That’s about what I know of this amazing metal worker. If anyone has anymore information, please share in the comments! 

Here’s another one …

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Dru Holland Enameled Cast Iron Au Gratin Casserole Dish circa 1960s

This is a Dru Holland single casserole baking dish. Dru was a popular company during the 1960s due to a resurgence in enameled cast iron. This stuff is durable, although prone to chipping. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot about the company that I can find. Most of their stuff that I’ve found is either light blue or mint green with these tulip designs or other flowers. It was made from the 1930s to the 1960s. Love the look.

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Dru Holland Blue Tulip

 

 

Finally, there’s this adorably round pitcher

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Danish Modern Queens Art Pewter Pitcher with Rattan Wrapped Handle circa 1960s

It was made by Queens Art Pewter. The company was in business from the 1930s to the early 2000s. I know that the “Queens” part of their name comes from Queens, New York, which is where they were based, and that 80% of their products were pewter. They also had a silver line. But that is all I’ve been able to glean about them.

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Maker’s Mark
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Rattan Wrapped Handle

 

So there are three pieces that I have in the Vintage Eve’s shop that are really cool, but that I can’t seem to find much information on, one way or the other. If any of you have  information on any of these pieces, please share in the comments! I love to hear from you.

I hope you have enjoyed this quick peek today. Have a great week!

 

Super Sascha

I really love finding stuff I’ve never heard of before. Some of the pieces on this blog have caused me to really look deeper into the origins of pieces, which is what I also love. So recently, I came across these pieces. Other than just being an absolutely beautiful design, they were by a designer I was not familiar with, Sascha Brastoff.

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Sascha Brastoff Saucer
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Surf Ballet

These saucers are a pinky-purple mixed with gold on an eggshell color base. The pattern name is Surf Ballet, which, let’s face it, is an awesome name. And it also looks like the foam from the ocean as it’s churned with a gorgeous sunset. That’s why I grabbed them for the store. They were too pretty to leave them languishing in a cupboard.

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Sascha Brastoff Horse Bowl (available at Buddhagal)

So who is Sascha Brastoff? It turns out he was a very popular designer of Mid-Century Modern ceramics and was very prolific during the 1950s and 1960s. He was born in 1918 in Cleveland, Ohio. He entered WWII going into the Air Force. When he got out, he actually worked for a while at Twentieth Century-Fox as a costume designer. 

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Sascha Brastoff Cigarette Set (available at hyggeligtgenbrug)

In “Made in the Twentieth Century: A Guide to Contemporary Collectibles” by Larry R. Paul, Sascha opened Sascha Brastoff Products, Inc. Then opening a ceramics plant in West Los Angeles in 1953, introducing his Rooster trademark that same year.

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Sascha Brastoff Rooster Mark

One of my favorite resources on American pottery, “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay,” by Lois Lehner, says this plant covered a full block and operated from 1953 to 1973. Sascha himself did all of the designs and then let his staff of about 20 people execute them under his supervision. A brochure that went out with some of his designs stated, “In his southern California studios, Brastoff has labored toward a double objective – the bringing of fine art into everyday living.” (Lehner, p. 55).

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Sascha Brastoff Water Jug (available at Unique Decor HM)

That epitomizes what he was trying to do. Don’t forget that coming out of the war, after all the rationing and foreign imports of ceramic wares were being cut off, there was a big demand for ceramic wares that were beautiful and functional. Add in the post-war building boom, and you can see the proliferation of American pottery that looked toward the modernist future but was also functional in order to furnish those new homes. Brastoff was able to fulfill that role.

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Sascha Brastoff Black Bowl (available at Hearthside Home)

His pieces cost from $25.00 and into the thousands for pieces that he himself produced. As far as the marks are concerned, his rooster mark with “Sascha Brastoff” underneath has been used since around 1953. That mark can be a gold sticker or backstamp. Another backstamp, “Sascha B.” which means he supervised the making of the piece. If he signed his full name in script “Sascha Brastoff,” it meant he did the piece himself from beginning to end.

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Sascha Brastoff Bowl (available at Mad4Mod Vintage)

There are also both of those “Sascha B.” and “Sascha Brastoff” in block letters as a backstamp. Both of those were stated to be in use since 1952 but specifically on a line of pottery designed by Sascha for B. Altman Company (Lehner, p. 17). According to Venice Clay Artists, Stangl and Royal Haeger were also licensed to use his designs. There’s usually a thick, “SB” on the piece designating the designer as Sascha Brastoff.

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Sascha Brastoff Salt and Pepper (available at Bayshore Attic)

Unfortunately, Sascha left his plant due to ill health in the 1960s. The plant closed in 1973 and he passed away in 1993, at the age of 75. He definitely left his mark on Mid-Century Modern pottery and his pieces were as highly prized then as they are today. If you think about a $25.00 piece in 1960, it would be like spending over $200 for a piece of pottery today when the average yearly family income was only $5600. I always find these figures remarkable. So that is the story of Sascha Brastoff and his gorgeous designs.

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Sascha Brastoff Hooded Ashtray (available at That70sShoppe)

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I hope your upcoming week holds lots of good things! I’m in the Northeast enjoying a well-deserved Spring and excitedly watching the early flowers bloom. Thanks for reading!

 

Lovely Old (and sold) Things

I thought it would be interesting to look at some lovely old things that have passed through my store in the last month or so. They are a mix of vintage items that I really couldn’t dig up a lot about so I thought I’d make one post out of 5 of them.

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Rumpp Shot Glasses with Leather Case 1940s

I loved these old shot glasses from the 1940s. Let me tell you, they weren’t in the shop long before they sold! They were produced by a company named Rumpp. The 4 shot glasses are silver-plated and fit snugly in their soft leather case with a snap. The bottom of the glasses say “Made in Germany U.S. Zone.” I’d never seen that mark before. My research says this mark was used between the years of 1945 to 1950.

C.F. Rumpp & Sons was a leather manufacturer that was open from the mid-1800s to 1959. It closed in 1959 and was demolished in 1965. They were well-known while they were around.

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1930s Children’s Puzzle by Tudor Press

This little puzzle wasn’t in the shop long either! By Tudor Press, it was from the 1930s and had Porky Pig and Puppy Sam. I thought it interesting that Porky Pig was named on the puzzle. The bow-tie-wearing pig I remember from the cartoons looks nothing like this but they appeared around the same time in the 1930s.

 

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Dru Enameled Cast Iron Butter Warmer Mid-Century Modern

 

As I’ve mentioned many times, I’m a huge fan of Mid-Century Modern. This little piece is enameled cast iron by a company called Dru Holland. It’s a small trivet that goes with the butter warmer by the same company, and in the same pattern. There is little to no information about the company online. They were in business during the 1960s; out of business by the 1970s. That’s about all I know of the company, but their stuff is classic Mid-Mod.

 

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Ned Smith Highball Glasses Signed

These are highball glasses all signed by an artist by the name of Ned Smith. He was a painter born in 1919 who became a nature artist. He was known for his very detailed and accurate drawings of wildlife for books and magazines. There is a website with a short biography about him at the Ned Smith Center. He died in 1985. I’m not sure exactly when these glasses were commissioned. I can tell you they didn’t stay long in the shop!

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Covered Casserole by Sadek from the 1970s Oven to Table Cookware

Lastly, there is this lovely lady. This piece is from the 1970s, a covered casserole dish with vibrant flowers. I love the shape of the handles. The Sadek Company was founded in 1936 by Charles and Norman Sadek. The Andrea line was named after Charles’ granddaughter and is still in production.

I love the pieces that I sell, that’s why I sell vintage. Each one has it’s own little history. I may not always be able to find more than a paragraph, or an entry at a licence or patent site, but each piece has an origin. If they could only talk … okay, seriously that would creep me out, but it would definitely be interesting!

I hope you have enjoyed a look at some lovely old pieces and their brief histories. Thank you for sharing your time with me and have a great week!

Danish Modern

I love Mid-Century Modern. In fact, my dream is to have a house filled with Mid-Mod furniture. Not sure if I’ll ever get that dream fulfilled but it’s out there. It definitely sells well in the Vintage Eve’s shop.

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Lundtofte Danish Modern Pans (available at Vintage Eve’s)

What I like about Mid-Century Modern are the lines of the furniture and other items that came out of this era and while it can be said that Danish Modern is part of the Mid-Century Modern movement, not all Mid-Century Modern is Danish Modern. So what exactly is Danish Modern?

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Chair by Kaare Klint circa 1930s (available at MidCenturyMobler)

Danish Modern started in the early part of the 20th century. According to Collectors Weekly, the grandfather of Danish Modern is considered to be Kaare Klint. He was a founder of the furniture school at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen around 1924. Klint believed that we didn’t need to reinvent furniture, just change the lines to give it a more modern look. Many of Klint’s followers were trained as architects which explains the architectural lines to the furniture.

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Fritz Hansen Tray Table (available at Hearthside Home)

Danish Modern is a period of time that runs from the 1930s to the 1970s. Collectors Weekly says it really took off post-WWII, though. It sort of grew out of the Bauhaus movement which used geometric design and art. This movement was about showing the structure, not hiding it. Danish Modern used these tenets.

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Danish Modern Teak Candle Holder (available at The Groove Vintage)

Another designer that was big in the Danish Modern movement was Arne Jacobsen. He was the creator of the Ant chair. It had 3 metal legs and was made out of a single piece of plywood. Danish Modern is all about keeping the materials real. They wanted people to see the structure of the furniture.

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Arne Jacobsen Ant Chair (available at Xcape Vintage)

He is also the guy who developed the Egg chair in 1958. The chair completely enveloped the sitter creating its own mini interior space around them. It was very sculptural. The material used in Danish Modern design was of the highest quality while still appealing to the middle class.

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Original Arne Jacobsen Egg Chair (available at Retro Appeal)

One of the materials that you will see a lot of in Danish Modern design is teak and other woods. Teak done right can be beautiful, as well as functional. It’s lightweight, too. Another wood was rosewood — paired with steel or other metals it gives these pieces their distinctive look. These items were always meant to appeal to the masses. Although they were made with the best of materials, they were meant to be mass produced for the middle class. The pieces were not just modern in line but also very functional for family life.

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Danish Modern Condiment Set circa 1960s (available at Little Cows)

According to Andrew Hollingsworth in “For the Love of Danish Modern Furniture” (Collectors Weekly, Keane & Monte), the reason Danish Modernism came to an end was progress. New ways of making furniture with colorful molded plastics, the late 60s and 70s, quality of materials declining to meet the demands of lower prices, all sort of converged to bring about the end of the movement.

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Georg Jensen Stainless Blue Shark Dinner Forks (available at Luola)

It’s definitely a look you either love or hate. I happen to love it, but many older people who grew up with it hate it. Go figure! Well, that is Danish Modern in a nutshell. Collectors Weekly has a great article on it for more in depth info. Have a great week and join me in the link parties to the right!

 

 

 

 

Kitties and Pixies

Oh my! It has been a whirlwind month! An exchange student from Japan came to our home and for two and a half weeks, shared her culture with us as we shared ours. It was an experience that I know our family will never forget. It was an awesome 2 1/2 weeks and I was surprised how much we missed her when she left. I say all of this to explain my absence for the last few weeks. Along with other obligations the blog has been a little neglected!

But here we are, together again and I would like to take a look at a prolific importer and designer of the mid-century, Holt-Howard. Their designs, like these cat S&P shakers, started off my small S&P collection. Here are the cats …

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Holt Howard Cozy Cats S&P

And some more of my collection. These are not for sale in the shop, because I love them too much!

The cats actually have a meowing canister in them so when you turn them upside down they meow. They don’t meow anymore, but they would have back in the day. Holt-Howard imported, designed and sold a lot of these cute items using cats, pixies and other animals. They started back in 1949 when John and Robert Howard and Grant Holt started the company.

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Cocktail Mice by Holt Howard circa 1960s (available at The Log Chateau)

According to Kovels the company started selling Christmas items made and sold in the U.S. Holt-Howard was originally based in New York City and moved to Stamford, Connecticut in 1955. Over the years they were sold a couple of times before closing in the 1990s. During their heyday, though, they produced different lines that are well-known in the vintage world.

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1958 Holt Howard Christmas Planter (available at Vintage Quality Finds)

 

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Double Taper Holder Holt Howard (available at Burst of Bambino)

As I said, they started with U.S. made goods but soon turned to overseas manufacturing to keep costs low. Some of their U.S. made Christmas stuff included the winking Santa and Merry Whiskers beverage sets.

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Holt Howard Merry Whiskers (available at The Pokey Poodle)

As their manufacturing moved overseas, they began to produce sort of cartoon type figures made into useful kitchen/household items. One of their lines was Pixieware. These are brightly colored kitchen items like the ones below.

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Holt Howard Pixieware Jam’n Jelly Jars with Spoons (available at House of Alexie)

This line was produced from about 1958 to the early 1960s. Many of the condiment jars are pretty easy to find but some of them are rarer than others. Those ones are the honey or chili sauce jars and there is also one for instant coffee (ahh can’t you just smell the Sanka!).

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Rare Liquor Decanter (available at My Daughters Matter)
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Rare Chili Sauce Pixieware by Holt Howard (available at My Daughters Matter)

The Pixieware line also included Spoofy Spoons, liquor decanters, salt and pepper sets, teapots and more. Another line was the Cozy Cats and Kittens line. That’s where my S&P shakers come in. In this line there were all sorts of things from string holders to ashtrays, spice sets and grease crocks.

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Holt Howard Cozy Kitten Cottage Cheese Container (available at Paul’s Retro Lounge)

They also produced the Exotic Rooster Line. I personally love roosters and during the 50’s and 60s they were very popular for decoration. Holt-Howard’s Red Rooster Coq Rouge dinnerware line, introduced in the 1960s, was designed by Bob Howard. This line was carried through the 1970s in finer department stores.

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Holt Howard Rooster S&P (available at So Fresh So Vintage)

Holt-Howard was copied by any number of copy cats. ThoughtCo., another blog, has a list of these copy cats and how to tell the difference between the knock offs and the real HH.

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Holt Howard Trivet in Coq Rouge Pattern (available at Rediscovered Retro)

As the years wore on, Holt-Howard was bought by General Housewares Corporation in 1968. By 1974 the Howard brothers and Holt had left to follow other dreams. The company was then again sold to Kay Dee Designs of Rhode Island in 1990. In fact Grant Holt and John Howard formed another company called Grant-Howard Associates which produced Pixieware pieces but nothing from the original Holt-Howard Pixieware line.

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Holt Howard Instant Coffee Jar (available at Mary’s Business)

I love the Holt-Howard pieces myself. Whimsical and fun but with a definite mid-century look. The pieces today just don’t capture the same look. Well, I hope you have enjoyed this post. Have a great week and look for me at the link parties on the right all week!

Vernon Kilns’ Deep Roots

Now this is an interesting history! I love these bowls I picked up for the shop a few months ago. Aren’t they pretty?! I love the design.

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Vernon Kilns Hibiscus Lugged Chowder Bowls (available at Vintage Eve’s)

Well, these particular bowls are from a company I had never heard of before I found these. They are by a pottery known as Vernon Kilns, out of Vernon, California. I say the history is interesting because I’m going to back it up to a period just before Vernon Kilns came into existence.

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Vernon Kilns Butter Dish May Flower (available at Coming Around Again)

According to “Collectible Vernon Kilns” by Maxine Feek Nelson, the beginning of the story starts with 2 brothers, Robert and James Furlong. They lived in Ireland and set out to find their fortune in the California Gold Rush in about 1848.

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Vernon Kilns Lei Lani Pitcher & Glasses (available at Mid Century Kind of Mood)

The weird thing is that they set out separately and somehow they managed to find each other in San Francisco a few years later. They actually found gold, unlike some unlucky souls who searched for years and found nothing. They decided to settle in Bakersfield, California, as ranchers and sent for their wives in Ireland.

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Vernon Kilns Plaid Coffee Pot Homespun Line (available at Alveta Vintage Items)

When Robert’s wife, Martha, arrived, they decided to move to Southern California and bought a ranch in Vernon, a town with a population of a few hundred people. It was a pretty good sized ranch where they raised their 4 children, Tom, James, Annie and Judith.

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Vernon Kilns Rockwell Kent Our America Transferware Commemorative Plate (available at Well Picked)

Tom and James became leaders of their community and well into the 20th century kept their hand in the government of Vernon. It was Judith where the Vernon Kilns piece of this gets going. As she grew up and became a teacher, a guy over in England with relatives in the pottery business set out for the States. His name was George J.W.(Wade) Poxon.

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Vernon Kilns Rio Vista Coffee Pot (available at Memories to Restore)

He worked his way through the states once he got here visiting many potteries along the way, especially those in Ohio. Until, lo and behold, he found himself in Vernon and decided to buy the ranch adjacent to the Furlong ranch. There he met, fell in love with and wooed Judith into marriage.

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Vernon Kilns Carafe and Mug Set (available at Quince Cottage Home)

As he settled down into married life, the china company he had started the year before, Poxon China, began taking off. They eventually had 65 people working at Poxon. They started making tile but switched to heavy hotel restaurant ware with the onset of WWI. So what does this have to do with Vernon Kilns? I’m almost there.

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Poxon Bowl (Worthpoint)

Sometime in July of 1931 Poxon China, which had had a good run, was sold to Faye G. Bennison. Vernon, by this time, had become part of Los Angeles, CA. Bennison continued to produce many of the successful lines of the Poxon China Company until an earthquake in 1933 destroyed the molds. This meant they had to develop their own shapes.

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Metlox Poppy Trail Pitcher (available at DK Collectibles)

In the late 1940s they almost closed due to fires but they kept going. They actually did quite well until, in a story we’ve seen many times, a flood of foreign imports sank the company. Vernon Kilns sold out to Metlox in 1958. Metlox continued to use the Vernon Kilns shapes under the Vernonware line until 1989.

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Metlox Vernonware Ovoid Bowls (available at Vintage Pottery)

The Vernon Kilns products were made from clay from Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina and England (Oocities.org). Many of their patterns were hand-painted.

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Metlox Poppy Trails Butter Dish (available at This and That 4 You)

So that is the story of Vernon Kilns. It started as one thing and ended as another. It didn’t have a long run, only 27 years. But since Vernon Kilns used Poxon molds and Metlox used Vernon Kilns molds, it can be difficult to tell from the shape which manufacturer you have when you are trying to date something.

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Vernon Kilns Disney Designed Dish or Planter (available at Butterfly Wing Vintage)

Am I the only person who found it amazing that 2 brothers managed to find each other in the Old West during the gold rush?! If it wasn’t for them settling in California and one of them moving to Vernon, this might have had a very different ending.

Join me at the link parties on the right this week! Do you have any Poxon or Vernon Kilns china? Tell me about it. I’d love to hear your story! Have a great week!

 

 

 

 

Mid Mod Meet Buenilum

Buenilum. If you can say that 10 times fast you should get an award! It does not exactly trip off the tongue. It is, however, an important name from the last century. As I am always on the look out for cool vintage pieces for the shop, hammered aluminum with that mid-century vibe catches my eye. Over the last year I’ve picked up this piece …

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Buenilum Covered Dish (available at Vintage Eve’s)

And this one, too…

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Buenilum Hammered Aluminum and Wood Covered Casserole Holder (available at Vintage Eve’s)

Buenilum is a brand name of the Buehner-Wanner Company. It was produced from the 1930s through the 1960s when the the company was sold to Pfaltzgraff in 1969.

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Buenilum Aqua and Aluminium Chafing Dish (available at Gazaboo)

One of the owners, Frederick Buehner, was a craftsman from Germany. He had studied at the Deutscher Werkbund which was an association of artists, craftsmen, architects and industrial designers. The other owner was Franz Wanner. The castle that is featured in their BW logo represents Buehner’s home town of Lindach and came into use around 1945.

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Buenilum Leaf Dishes (available at GRITSGirlz)

The name “Buenilum” was a smash-up of Fredereick’s last name and aluminum. It wasn’t a new formulation for aluminum but a brand name for the BW Company. Many of these pieces have Pyrex liners so there has to be some connection there.

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Buenilum Bowl (available at Fourth Estate Sale)

The company started in New York in an office near the 59th Street Bridge but eventually moved to Norwalk, Connecticut where they stayed until they closed for good in 1973.

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Buenilum Ice Bucket with Tongs (available at Night Shift Vintage)

 

There is not a lot of information on this company. I needed to use multiple sources to put this post together; each with just a little bit of info. I did want to highlight this company though, because a lot of their pieces epitomize the mid-century modern aesthetic. The hammered aluminum mixed with teak and other woods is, in my book, beautiful.

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Buenilum and Corning Carafe (available at Vintaretto)

Thanks for stopping by. If you have any memories of Buenilum at your table growing up, please share! I will be on the link-parties to the right this week; if you have a second, check them out. Have a great week!

 

 

Hey Hazel!

In my travels I recently picked up this beautiful divided dish. I love the shell handles and lovely ribbed design.

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Hazel-Atlas Depression Glass Divided Dish (available at Vintage Eve’s)

It went into the Vintage Eve’s Etsy shop today, but before I could do that, I needed to find out who manufactured it since it was unmarked. Turns out it was the Hazel-Atlas company. I have a few pieces in the shop by Hazel-Atlas like this jelly jar.

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Hazel-Atlas Jelly Jar circa 1930s (available at Vintage Eve’s)

At one time in America, Hazel-Atlas was one of the largest glass manufacturers in the world. According to Collectors Weekly the company started out as Hazel Glass Company in 1885 and were making opal glass liners for Mason jar zinc caps.

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Hazel-Atlas Jar Liner (available at SparkkleJar)

Then in 1902 the company name was changed to Hazel-Atlas when they merged with the Atlas Glass Company of Washington, Pennsylvania. By this point, the company was a leader in making fruit jars, oil bottles and commercial glass containers for everything you can think of. Pickle jars, check. Vaseline jars, check. Need a snuff bottle, Hazel-Atlas was probably making it.

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Hazel-Atlas Milk of Magnesia Bottle (available at Kentucky Trader)

They also made a number of these containers in colors. Amber, blue, crystal, yellow. This is in part what led to their production of dinnerware and glassware, many of it known as Depression Glass today. Their first line of dinnerware was known as Ovide.

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Hazel-Atlas Ovide Tea Cups circa 1930s (available at Miss Ellies Vintage)

It was made in a transparent green or an opaque black, the black is above. Collectors Weekly says that another early pattern was called Ribbon. Moderntone was introduced in 1934 in cobalt and amethyst.

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Hazel-Atlas Ribbon Pattern (available at LazyYVintage)

Then in 1936, Hazel-Atlas came out with Platonite, a sort of semi-opaque glass that is often mistaken for milk glass. Platonite could come in any color but are more often than not found in white with colored concentric rings that have been fired onto the white.

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Hazel-Atlas Platonite Drippings Jar (available at OnePomMom)

During the post-WWII years, they became popular for their fired-on patterns. Many of these were created by the Gay Fad Decorating Company. Collectors Weekly lists designs such as dancing sailors, hats, windmills, maple leaves, daisies, musical instruments and flying geese as all popular motifs. There are many more designs that can be checked out at Collectors Weekly.

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Hazel-Atlas Black Drizzle Bottle circa 1950s (available at Vintage Eve’s)

The mark to look for is a large H with a small A under the “H’s” bar. This mark was used starting around 1923 (GlassBottleMarks.com).

Hazel-Atlas Mark from GlassBottleMarks.com

Although this mark is found on many of their bottles, most of their Depression Glass bears no mark. It’s on the bottom of my jelly jar, but not the dish at the top of this post. Another line that Hazel-Atlas put out was kiddie ware that consisted of bowls, mugs and plates for children.

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Hazel-Atlas Kiddie Ware Hopalong Cassidy (available at Pleroma Vintage)

The company did well with the kiddie ware but they really did well with their kitchenware. They made mixing bowls, butter dishes, juicers (or reamers), among other things. They also made refrigerator dishes and Platonite stacking storage containers. They also made shakers.

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Hazel-Atlas Ritz Blue Butter Dish (available at SilverGoldFindings)

I have been trying to track down what actually happened to the company. At this writing, I haven’t been able to do that. They were producing stuff that people were buying but in 1956, running 13 plants, the Continental Can Company purchased the firm. According to Archiving Wheeling the sale was contested and it took from 1956 to 1964 for the sale to be completed. After that, most of the factories were sold off and the Hazel-Atlas company ceased to exist.

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Hazel-Atlas Drink Set with Ice Bucket Early 1960s (available at A Sparrow Flies)

So that is the story of the Hazel-Atlas Company. What once was is no more, however, they have produced some enduring pieces that are beautiful and functional. Such a great company and one that gave people work through the Great Depression. If you have a favorite Hazel-Atlas piece, let me know. I would love to hear about it. Also, check out the link parties on the right where I will be sharing my blog with other great bloggers this week. As always, have a great week!!

 

Gorgeous Georges

I am always on the hunt for pieces to put in the Vintage Eve’s shop. It is rare that at least one day a week, usually Saturday, isn’t somewhat devoted to scouring thrift stores and estate sales for treasures. As you have probably noticed, I’m super drawn to mid-century modern. I love the lines and the mix of mediums used to create the look. One particular designer I’ve managed to collect a few pieces of is Georges Briard. I found another piece of his recently at the estate sale I referenced last week. I already have another one of his pieces for sale in the store. These are the two pieces.

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Georges Briard Forbidden Fruit Pattern (available at Vintage Eve’s)
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Georges Briard Relish Bowl with Attached Fork (available at Vintage Eve’s)

You can tell they are his because, well, they are signed, but also just because they look like his style as you get to know it. I was surprised to find out that Georges Briard is not his real name. His real name is Jakub Brojdo. According to Collectors Weekly he was born the Ukraine and raised in Poland.

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Georges Briard Food Warmer circa 1960 (available at A Vintage Peace)

He came to the U.S. in 1937 to study at the Art Institute of Chicago. He did earn a Masters in Fine Art. He also changed his first name at that time to Jascha (Yascha) although I am not sure why. If anyone out there knows, please leave me a comment!

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Green Garden Roasting Pan by Georges Briard (available at RLD Glass)

He served in the U.S. Army in WWII after which he moved to New York. Collectors Weekly says that he started painting metal serving trays and signing them Brojdo. So be on the lookout for those, they are quite a find! Because it wasn’t long after that his friend Max Wille hired him to create designs for him at the M. Wille Company. It was Max that thought up the name Georges Briard to mark his commercial pieces.  His “last name came as an inspiration at a dog show, the first was added to give continental flair” (Antique Trader).

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Georges Briard Percolator (available at Sewing and Goods)

The reason for the name change is that it left his real name free for his real artwork. Georges Briard designs really caught on through the 1950s to the 1970s. He became an award-winning designer with his pieces selling in high-end department stores; Nieman Marcus, Bonwit Teller and others.

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Georges Briard Lowball Glasses circa 1950s (available at Pickness)

He worked with many different glass companies, too. According to Antique Trader, he worked with Libbey and Anchor Hocking, upgrading items that would usually sell at the five and dime to then be pieces sold in Bloomingdale’s and other upscale retailers.

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Georges Briard Ceramic Tray/Plate (available at Jill’s Fantastic Frills)

Some items that you can find with his designs are enameled cookware, wooden cheeseboards with tile inserts, bisque pieces, dinnerware and lamps. His designs can also be found on melamine dinnerware by Stetson.

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Georges Briard Chip and Dip Set (available at Frieda’s Finds)

Brodjo received the Frank S. Child Lifetime Achievement Award given by The Society of Glass and Ceramic Decorators in 2004 to celebrate his contribution to the glass and ceramic industry. He died in New York in 2005 at the age of 88. He left a great legacy behind.

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Georges Briard Melamine Plates (available at Artistic Floral Design)

That is the story of how Jakub Brodjo came to America and left his indelible mark on it as Georges Briard. It’s amazing what one can accomplish in a lifetime. I know that I love his pieces and their stylish mid-century modern aesthetic. I hope you have enjoyed reading about him and let me know if you have ever loved or found one of his pieces. Have a great week!

I will be partying this week at all the link parties on the right — check them out; all wonderful blogs!

Mid-Century Modern Marvelous-ness

This week’s post is about something that is near and dear to my heart. One of my absolute favorite movements in design has always been Mid-Century Modern. We hear it and see it when we go looking for our vintage treasures and we know it when we see it. But what is Mid-Century Modern? Where did it start? Who gave it that name? It obviously wasn’t called that as people were creating the iconic pieces that defined the movement (can I get an “Eames!”) But just like Art Deco, it was coined Mid-Century Modern somewhere along the way. Just look at all this MCM goodness I’ve added to the store recently!

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Mid-Century Modern (photo courtesy of Vintage Eve’s)

I am totally drawn to MCM, myself. I love the lines, the sculptured form balanced with the usefulness of the design. It makes me think of the 1960s, a house of windows high in the Hollywood hills. Wood, metal, and popping color. Sunken living rooms. Original “Man From U.N.C.L.E.” kind of stuff. That particular show makes me think of guys in turtle necks, hanging out in their Danish Modern apartments.

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Mid Century Modern Arm Chair (photo courtesy of Casara Modern Shop)

So who did coin the “Mid-Century Modern” name? According to Curbed.com, a woman by the name of Cara Greenberg used the term first as the title of her book “Midcentury Modern: Furniture of the 1950s” published in 1984. She made it up and it stuck. The term was adopted quickly and came to embody an aesthetic that ranged from the “mid-1940s to the mid-1960s” (CollectorsWeekly).

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Adorable Teak and Metal Snail Hors-D’oeuvres Forks (photo courtesy of Brass Teak)

Collectors Weekly says that MCM is frequently associated with Eichler tract homes that popped up during the 1950s in California. Eichler says he was inspired by a Frank Lloyd Wright house that he lived in briefly. Glass walls, open floor plans, varied heights to give dimension (think half-walls and sunken living rooms). Who knew I could mention sunken living rooms twice in one post! Let’s face it, I just think they’re cool.

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Sunken Living Room 1960s

The MCM aesthetic came out of the U.S., Britain, Japan and of course Scandinavia. From the U.S. we had Eames whose chairs, created in the 1940s and 1950s are highly collectible. They were made from wood, fiberglass, and metal. His designs were really new and unique in design and technology. His molded chairs were very different from what had been designed before.

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Eames Rocking Chair (photo courtesy of Vintage Blohms)

Herman Miller was another name in furniture. With architect George Nelson designing for the Herman Miller Company from 1945 until the 1980s, Herman Miller produced some of the most iconic MCM furniture that is synonymous with what we think of when we think mid-century modern (CollectorsWeekly).

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Herman Miller Eames Chair (photo courtesy of Atomic Junkies Gallery)

In other countries the aesthetic was alive and well. In England, Robin Day was creating convertible beds, tables and chairs. In Scandinavia Børge Mogensen was designing his Sleigh Chair and Arne Jacobsen was designing his Swan Chair.

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Jacobsen Swan Chair (photo courtesy of MCMUnique)

Furniture was not the only thing being created during this time. CollectorsWeekly says that clocks were a big thing during this time. Sunbursts, asterisks and more were being designed. Lighting was also taking on a completely different look.

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Sunburst Clock (photo courtesy of Records and Vintage)

Lights that were made from steel and plastic, designed to be hung from the ceiling became popular as did pole-tension lamps that added light to corners of the room. As CollectorsWeekly says, this was really the last time in history that “design drove the look and feel of popular culture” instead of the other way around.

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Holm Sorensen Copper Pendant Lights (photo courtesy of Danish Vintage Designs)

The key elements of  mid-century modern architecture are flat planes, large windows, changes in elevation, and integration with nature. Those large windows inviting you to bring the outdoors in from multiple vantage points (hgtv.com).

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Mid Century Modern Home Plan (from a book courtesy of PopuLuxe)

Mid-century modern is even more collectible today than ever. These designs are either loved or hated by people with very little middle ground. Collectors look for really unique pieces, which can definitely be found as this was such a breakout time period. Love it or hate it, it’s definitely found its part in history.

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Alvar Aalto Danish Modern Chairs (photo courtesy of Deerstedt)

That was fun! I really enjoy finding out about the things I love. What do you think about mid-century modern? Love it? Loathe it? Have a house designed around it? Leave a comment! I love hearing from all of you!

As always, I will be partying with all my friends at the link parties noted on the right. Have a great week!