Noritake From the Beginning

I hope you have been enjoying this summer. Well, here it is summer. It’s been very hot and humid this year in southern New Hampshire, but life is good. Since we only really have three or four months of warm weather, I’ll take it!

As always, I have been on the hunt for new things to add to the Vintage Eve’s shop this summer. I’ve come across some nice pieces, too! I am definitely drawn to fine china. It’s part of my obsession with vintage kitchen stuff (as if you couldn’t tell from reading this blog), but that’s why I have the shop — to support my habit, which in turn allows me to buy more. It’s a circle.

I happen to have a few pieces by Noritake and I was wondering the other day how long they have been in business. So, here we go.

rose noritake
Noritake Vegetable Serving Bowl in Pasadena Pattern circa 1960s

Noritake started as a trading company in 1876. According to Noritakechina.com it was the baby of the Morimura brothers. Ichizaemon Morimura decided to open an export business, mainly to keep money flowing into his country, and he sent his brother, Toyo, to New York to open Morimura Brothers, an import business. Very smart really. Morimura Brothers imported china and other items for sale in the U.S., exported by the other brother, Ichizaemon (Noritake.co.jp).

In Noritake, a small suburb of Nagoya, Japan, a factory was created in 1904, particularly to create fine porcelain dinnerware to export to the United States. It didn’t happen until 1914, though, that they were able to accomplish this feat. There was a lot of trial and error to get a dinnerware line that could be exported.

cho cho 1
Noritake Cho Cho San Gravy Boat circa 1950s

Most of their designs were hand-painted in the beginning with a liberal addition of gold embellishment. As they grew, they perfected their manufacturing techniques and Noritake took off. Noritake china is now sold world-wide. Originally, the brand was called “Nippon Toki Gomei Kaisha,” which eventually became Noritake Company, Limited.

IMAG0683
Flat Boullion Cups Rochambeau Pattern circa 1920s

IMAG0679

Their backstamps, or porcelain marks, vary greatly. The earliest one is a circle with a “Maruki Mark,” dating to 1902. There is also a “Royal Sometuke NIPPON” mark that dates to 1906. One registered mark in 1908 is an “RC” underlined over a fulcrum with “Noritake” underneath. There is an extensive list of marks with pictures at http://www.noritakecollectorsguild.info/bstamps/. Check them out.

20171014_170430
Noritake Cho Cho San Trio circa 1950s

It was very interesting that two brothers started this company, and that it is still in business. The company managed to diversify into many different fields, which served them well. Along with fine china, the company currently creates grinding wheels for various industries, their printing and color mixing techniques are used in technology, including automobiles, and their engineering techniques are used in yet other areas of industry. They survived during the Occupation years after WWII, and continued to create and diversify into present day.

cho cho 2
Noritake Fine China Back Stamp circa 1950s

I hope you enjoyed learning about this company with its rich history. Japan itself is a beautiful country. My daughter recently returned from a school trip there, and her pictures are amazing.

I hope that you enjoy the rest of your summer (if it’s summer where you are!). I will enjoy the roughly 60 days before it turns colder here, although, I’m more a fan of Autumn in New Hampshire, anyway. If you’ve never experienced a Fall in New Hampshire, with the burst of oranges, golds, and reds, it’s amazing, and only lasts a month, maybe a month and a half if you’re lucky. I’m hoping for a long Autumn before the snow flies. Have a great week!

 

A Toast to Toast Racks

I recently added to the Vintage Eve’s shop, and quickly sold, a lovely little silver-plated toast rack. In researching how to price it, I saw so many pretty toast racks it made me wonder how far back these go? Also, when did they actually start making toast? So of course that led me to when did they decide they needed a rack to stand them up and why?

Here is a picture of the toast rack that started this short jaunt.

tr1
William Hutton & Sons Toast Rack 1930s

The top is a little squished, but it is almost 100-years old, and one must forgive some flaws in a piece that old. Here’s a unique one in Lusterware from the 40s.

tr5
1940s Lusterware Toast Rack (available at Tiny China Vintage)

According to a New York Times article, toast has been around for awhile. It comes from the Latin “Torrere” which means “to burn.” While burnt toast isn’t the ideal, they actually originally used toast to flavor alcohol. They usually used stale bread that would hold up to toasting in the fire. They had toasting forks so they could hold the toast in the fire until it was just the right color.

tr2
James Deakin Toast Rack 1900s Art Nouveau (available at Vintage and Deco)

The first toast racks seem to have come into existence sometime in the late 1700s, that comes from a mix of different sources. They all seem to agree that the 1770s is about the right time. They were simple devices at the beginning, just wire soldered to a tray type of thing. They got more elaborate as people started using them.

tr3
James Dixon Toast Rack 1910s (available at Museography)

They were used because it kept the toast from getting soggy and the crumbs would get caught in the tray, keeping everything neat and tidy. There are some really wonderful examples of toast racks out there.

tr4
Edwardian Era Toast Rack (available at White Hart Antiques)

People tend to use these as letter holders these days, or they did until email took the place of snail mail. Time marches on, you know. I’m sure we’ll find another use for these. Maybe we might even go back to using them for toast!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this foray into toast racks. Enjoy your week!

 

What’s Cooking?

One of the things I love to find while I’m out and about are vintage cookbooks for a couple of reasons. One being that they sell well in my Etsy shop, the other is that I love thumbing through these vintage books looking at pictures from my childhood and before. Take a look at this one I found recently which I adore.

20171111_151816
Famous Eating Places
20171111_152215
Those graphics!!!!

It’s actually a cross-collectible for those that collect automobile memorabilia since it was put out by the Ford and Lincoln-Mercury Dealerships back in 1954. I love that there are 4 recipes from my state and many more from all over the United States. One of the restaurants is still standing in Portsmouth, NH, but is not a restaurant anymore, it’s a business. Time marches on.

Here is another one that I really like.

C360_2016-06-27-10-41-27-621
Betty Crocker helps you with all your hostess needs!

These Betty Crocker books have great pictures and recipes. Look at that spread!

C360_2016-06-27-10-43-34-686

Here is another from Betty.

20171028_154742
Not sure what that white ring is but I’m all in for that fondue!!

I especially like cookbooks from the 1950s and 1960s. And if you’ve read my many blog entries, you know I love Mid-Century stuff. And that includes cookbooks.

Although, here’s an oldy. A reproduction from the early Williamsburg days.

20170506_144245
Close up!

Obviously, people have been writing down recipes for a long time. Did you know that the oldest recipes ever found were written on clay tablets? Called the Yale Culinary Tablets, they date back to 1700 B.C. They only list the ingredients though and not the directions (Yale Tablets). It was sort of a crap shoot I guess if you got it right. Click the link for more info.

Here’s one that is relevant for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday!

20170610_161637
Who knew the cranberry was so versatile!
20170610_161833
Free Recipes!

Does anyone remember the Galloping Gourmet? I remember my dad watching this show on Saturday afternoons.

C360_2016-09-18-10-47-41-285
There he is! Not my dad, the Galloping Gourmet!

There are so many different kinds of cookbooks. One that recently sold in the shop was from the 1960s that was a compilation of Boston Globe recipes. I almost didn’t let that one go. One that I am keeping for now because I need more time to explore it is this one.

20171112_125311

20171112_125502
Anyone need a recipe for a Teen-Age Square Dance?! Here’s one!

I like the way it reads like a story and I want to try some of the recipes. This one is interesting in that it was written in 1959 and it has a section on cooking for food allergies and another section warning about fad diets. I didn’t think they knew about those issues back then! So I’ll hang on to this one.

Well, I thank you for taking the time to enjoy these great vintage cookbooks with me. Most of them (not all) are available in the Vintage Eve’s shop on Etsy. As always, have a wonderful day and maybe try a new (old) recipe!! If you do, drop me a line and let me know what you made. Always looking for something different to answer that age-old question … what’s for dinner?! My kids don’t even have to wait til I get home to ask anymore, they text me that question now. Time does indeed march on but the question remains the same. Have a great week!

 

AKA Syracuse China

Hi! I’ve been so busy I haven’t had time to write! We have been getting ready for an exchange student and it’s amazing how much stuff builds up in your house when you’ve been somewhere for 10+ years. I have a full time job, as well, so the blog took the hit this month. But I wanted to talk about a company that is known as Syracuse China.

I found this pretty little cup and saucer the other day for the shop.

sc1
Syracuse China Lady Louise Teacup and Saucer (available at Vintage Eve’s)

I love the rich colors! This particular pattern is called Lady Louise and comes from about the 1940s. It’s marked Old Ivory, which is the shape, by Syracuse China. I was curious about who they were so if you are, too, let’s find out who they are.

sc2
O.P.Co. Tea Pot (available at Pungo Vintage)

In 1871, according to Syracuse Then and Now, The Onondaga Pottery Company opened it’s doors when sixteen local businessmen banded together and bought a local struggling pottery. This company was also called, O.P.Co. and was located in Geddes, New York, which is now part of Syracuse. The name came from the county in which it was located, as well as a nod to the native Iroquois tribe.

sc4
O.P.Co. Syracuse China Indian Tree Plate (available at The Little Things N More)

After they capitalized the company for $50,000, they began to expand their white earthenware lines that the old pottery manufactured. O.P.Co. was not located close to the other big potteries in the area. They settled where there were no natural clay sources or coal for running the kilns. No one in the area were clay workers but they were located on the Erie Canal and the railroads so they were able to bring in what they needed easily enough.

sc5
Railroad Dishes by Syracuse China (available at Sweetest Stella)

The first of O.P.Co.’s Superintendents had hired English potters and trained the local men in making English pottery. In fact, the first company backstamp was a Lion and Unicorn Arms until it was changed in 1873 to the Great Seal of the State of New York. The pottery went undecorated until 1884 when Boston China Decorating Works opened up across the street. They now had access to a designer, printer and hand decorator, at least until a fire destroyed the Boston China Decorating Works in 1886.

sc6
Syracuse China Coralbel Creamer and Sugar (available at Jo’s China Shop)

So O.P.Co. decided to take everyone into their building thereby establishing one of the earliest in-house decorating departments. At this point, they are still O.P.Co. Syracuse Then and Now says that in 1888 James Pass, the Superintendent at that time who later became president, created America’s “first truly vitreous china body.” (syracusethenandnow.org). Imperial Geddo was a line of fancy accessory pieces that were introduced at the World’s Colombian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 where it won the award for most translucent china.

sc7
Syracuse China Trend Cups (available at Vintage Rescuer)

Two years after the award, the name Syracuse China started showing up on these pieces as a backstamp. Eventually they dropped their other earthenware body pieces and all of their products were vitreous “Syracuse China.”

sc8
Mustard Pot by Syracuse China (available at TreasureWares)

They became big in the hotel market with a chip-resistant round edge shape introduced in 1896. In 1908 they led the industry in perfecting the under glaze decal process. Then in 1913 Bert Salisbury became president with the death of James Pass. New products that came to market from Salisbury’s time were Old Ivory in 1926 and Adobe in 1931. They also specialized in china for the nation’s railroads.

sc9
Syracuse China Adobe Ware Egg Cups (available at SuzyQVintage)

During WWII, Richard Pass was president and helped the war effort by manufacturing non-detectable ceramic anti-tank land mines. In the 1950s they opened the Onondaga Pottery Electronics Division where they produced “reliable printed circuit components for radio and television manufacturers” (syracusethenandnow.org).

sc10
Syracuse China Drip Bowl (available at Treasures We Love)

Up until 1971, the company had been been owned by 2 Syracuse families. In 1971 new management took over. They purchased the assets of the company and formed Syracuse China Corporation. In 1978 they merged with Canadian Pacific Investments, Ltd. With this new backing they continued to thrive. There were a few more changes of hands including Susquehanna-Pfaltzgraff and then Libbey owning the company.

sc11
Syracuse China Grill Plate Shanghai (available at LexyLady’sTreasures)

Again, we see the merging of all these big industry names as the company morphs over the years. This is how these companies survive in order to weather difficult times and changes in management. It’s interesting how they are interconnected!

Well, that’s it for this week! Please join me at the link parties listed on the right and have a great week!

Hall of Fame

Hall China Company. I see so many pieces with the Hall or Hall’s mark and for good reason; they have been in business since August 14, 1903! And they are still in business! There are so few companies that have lasted that long that they deserve a little fame.

hall2
Hall’s Superior Quality Bowl (available at Vintage Eve’s)

Hall China Company is one of those companies that came out of Ohio. They were started at East Fourth and Walnut Streets in East Liverpool, Ohio. According to one of my favorite sources, “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay” by Lois Lehner, the company was founded by Robert Hall and his son, Robert T. Hall. Unfortunately, the elder Hall died in 1904!

hall1
Hall’s Superior Quality Decorated Teapot circa 1940s (available at Buy The Lake Vintage)

Originally the company made whiteware from 1905 to 1911. This helped get the company off the ground. Robert T. Hall wanted more for the company, though. He had an idea that proved to be the product that made the company stand out above the rest. He developed a new glaze that was “single fire, non-lead, hard, non-porous and craze proof” (Lehner, 1988, p. 187). They called this their “Secret Process.”

hall3
Hall China Co. Hotpoint Refrigerator Pitcher circa 1930s (available at Lovettsville)

From this point in 1914, they began to grow and expand quite a lot. They got into cookware such as casseroles, teapots and coffee urn liners (for industrial uses). In 1919 they bought the Goodwin Pottery Plant to make decorated teapots. They were soon the leader in teapots. In 1920 Robert T. Hall passed away and Malcolm W. Thompson took over.

hall4
Hall Super-Ceram Graduated Set (available at Abundancy)
hall5
Hall Super-Ceram Mark (available at Abundancy)

They continued to grow acquiring other plants until in 1930 they abandoned all the other buildings and moved into a large facility which they added to 8 times over the years. It is the facility they still use and encompasses 12 acres!

halls6
Hall’s China Co. Covered Casserole (available at Ric’s Relics)

As time marched on, their lines grew. There is Hall Fireproof China which covers casseroles and other baking dishes, teapots, coffee pots, serving dishes and storage dishes. Many of these pieces have been produced for the industrial/restaurant sectors. Hall’s Superior Quality, like the piece at the top of this post, was available through stamp stores and large merchandising centers.

hall7
Hall’s Flare-Ware Teapot (available at Lilly’s Vintage Cupboard)
hall71
Hall China Flare Ware Mark (available at Lilly’s Vintage Cupboard)

Super-Ceram is their’s, too. It’s a tough, white ceramic. There are over 100 marks associated with Hall China Co. They help to identify them as made for the railroads, airlines, restaurants and stores like Montgomery Wards, Sears and Roebuck and the Jewell Tea Company. At one point they even had a partnership with Longaberger Baskets. They are now joined with Homer Laughlin China under the HLC Inc. umbrella.

hall8
Hall Covered Refrigerator Dish for Montgomery Ward (available at Classy Vintage Glass)
hall81
Hall China Co. Mark for Montgomery Ward & Co. (available at Classy Vintage Glass)

As you can see, Hall China Co. knew how to stay in business. They diversified and managed to make a good product which they moved through many different venues. If you can get your hands on Lehner’s book, she has an extensive number of marks for identifying years of manufacture. I don’t receive any monetary compensation for recommending her book, it’s just a great resource.

If you have any stories of a favorite Hall China piece, leave me a comment. I love hearing from everyone! Please join me at the link parties on the right and have a great week!

 

 

 

Jazzy Jeannette

In some of the posts I’ve done including one on Depression Glass and another on Glasbake , Jeannette Glass Company has made an appearance. It’s an interesting history that is intertwined with some other glass houses. I have this lovely set for sale in the Vintage Eve’s store. I love the pattern and the glass is solid and heavy in your hand.

jg1
Jeannette Glass Creamer and Sugar in Cube Pattern (available at Vintage Eve’s)

As I mentioned in my Glasbake post, Jeannette Glass isn’t named after someone but rather somewhere, Jeannette, Pennsylvania. According to the “Hidden History of the Laurel Highlands” by Cassandra Vivian, Jeannette Glass Company started as the McKee-Jeannette Glass Company in 1904.

jg3
Jadite Shaker Set by Jeannette Glass (available at JustAboutModern)

McKee was a glass maker in 1899 when he sold his business to the National Glass Company tableware trust. In 1906 it was listed as the “largest tableware glass factory in the world” (Vivian, 2014). They sent their tablewares all over the United States and Europe by that time.

jg4
Jeannette Glass Powder Jar (available at Hubbard House Antiques)

During the early 1900s the company went through a few name changes but continued to make glassware. They made pressed glass, jadite, white milk glass, black glass and they were the creators of Glasbake. They even made headlight lenses! Don’t forget though, this was the McKee-Jeannette Glass Company. Eventually in the 1960s, this company was absorbed into the Jeannette Glass Company.

jg5
Pink Milk Glass by Jeannette Glass (available at Bygone Find)

Jeannette Glass Company started in 1890. It was right next to the McKee Glass Company. They made pressed glassware. Jeannette Bottle Works was also around at that time making bottles. They were absorbed into the Jeannette Glass Company in 1898 and started making glass jars for condiments of all kinds.

jg6
Jeannette Glass Co. Hottle Pots (available at Trends From Then)

So as you can see, all of these companies sort of morphed into one big Jeannette Glass Company which actually closed for good in 1983. There is a company called Jeannette Specialty Glass Company that is still in business but that is not the Jeannette Glass Company that we think of when we think of Depression Glass and glass through the mid-century.

jg7
Set of 3 Jeannette Glass Co. Classics (available at Whimsical Things Too)

As I said, an interesting history. I am always amazed at how blurred the lines between companies can become over the years. All this information came from the book I referenced by Cassandra Vivian, which can be found at Amazon.

Well, that is everything I found out about Jeannette Glass Company. I hope you have learned something as I did. Please join me at the link parties listed to the right. I’ll be linking up all week with some other fabulous blogs! Drop me a note if you have a moment in your day and have a great week!

Hey Hazel!

In my travels I recently picked up this beautiful divided dish. I love the shell handles and lovely ribbed design.

c360_2016-11-20-15-15-17-288
Hazel-Atlas Depression Glass Divided Dish (available at Vintage Eve’s)

It went into the Vintage Eve’s Etsy shop today, but before I could do that, I needed to find out who manufactured it since it was unmarked. Turns out it was the Hazel-Atlas company. I have a few pieces in the shop by Hazel-Atlas like this jelly jar.

ha1
Hazel-Atlas Jelly Jar circa 1930s (available at Vintage Eve’s)

At one time in America, Hazel-Atlas was one of the largest glass manufacturers in the world. According to Collectors Weekly the company started out as Hazel Glass Company in 1885 and were making opal glass liners for Mason jar zinc caps.

ha3
Hazel-Atlas Jar Liner (available at SparkkleJar)

Then in 1902 the company name was changed to Hazel-Atlas when they merged with the Atlas Glass Company of Washington, Pennsylvania. By this point, the company was a leader in making fruit jars, oil bottles and commercial glass containers for everything you can think of. Pickle jars, check. Vaseline jars, check. Need a snuff bottle, Hazel-Atlas was probably making it.

ha4
Hazel-Atlas Milk of Magnesia Bottle (available at Kentucky Trader)

They also made a number of these containers in colors. Amber, blue, crystal, yellow. This is in part what led to their production of dinnerware and glassware, many of it known as Depression Glass today. Their first line of dinnerware was known as Ovide.

ha6
Hazel-Atlas Ovide Tea Cups circa 1930s (available at Miss Ellies Vintage)

It was made in a transparent green or an opaque black, the black is above. Collectors Weekly says that another early pattern was called Ribbon. Moderntone was introduced in 1934 in cobalt and amethyst.

ha7
Hazel-Atlas Ribbon Pattern (available at LazyYVintage)

Then in 1936, Hazel-Atlas came out with Platonite, a sort of semi-opaque glass that is often mistaken for milk glass. Platonite could come in any color but are more often than not found in white with colored concentric rings that have been fired onto the white.

ha8
Hazel-Atlas Platonite Drippings Jar (available at OnePomMom)

During the post-WWII years, they became popular for their fired-on patterns. Many of these were created by the Gay Fad Decorating Company. Collectors Weekly lists designs such as dancing sailors, hats, windmills, maple leaves, daisies, musical instruments and flying geese as all popular motifs. There are many more designs that can be checked out at Collectors Weekly.

ha2
Hazel-Atlas Black Drizzle Bottle circa 1950s (available at Vintage Eve’s)

The mark to look for is a large H with a small A under the “H’s” bar. This mark was used starting around 1923 (GlassBottleMarks.com).

Hazel-Atlas Mark from GlassBottleMarks.com

Although this mark is found on many of their bottles, most of their Depression Glass bears no mark. It’s on the bottom of my jelly jar, but not the dish at the top of this post. Another line that Hazel-Atlas put out was kiddie ware that consisted of bowls, mugs and plates for children.

ha9
Hazel-Atlas Kiddie Ware Hopalong Cassidy (available at Pleroma Vintage)

The company did well with the kiddie ware but they really did well with their kitchenware. They made mixing bowls, butter dishes, juicers (or reamers), among other things. They also made refrigerator dishes and Platonite stacking storage containers. They also made shakers.

ha10
Hazel-Atlas Ritz Blue Butter Dish (available at SilverGoldFindings)

I have been trying to track down what actually happened to the company. At this writing, I haven’t been able to do that. They were producing stuff that people were buying but in 1956, running 13 plants, the Continental Can Company purchased the firm. According to Archiving Wheeling the sale was contested and it took from 1956 to 1964 for the sale to be completed. After that, most of the factories were sold off and the Hazel-Atlas company ceased to exist.

ha11
Hazel-Atlas Drink Set with Ice Bucket Early 1960s (available at A Sparrow Flies)

So that is the story of the Hazel-Atlas Company. What once was is no more, however, they have produced some enduring pieces that are beautiful and functional. Such a great company and one that gave people work through the Great Depression. If you have a favorite Hazel-Atlas piece, let me know. I would love to hear about it. Also, check out the link parties on the right where I will be sharing my blog with other great bloggers this week. As always, have a great week!!

 

Some of My favorite Things – RRP Co.

When I first started writing this blog, my first post was on my favorite bowls. I love bowls. I think I’ve established that in subsequent posts. In that first post, one of the bowls I showed was this one …

McCoy mixing bowl

Robinson Ransbottom Bowl Girl With Watering Can circa 1930s

It will never be put up for sale in my shop because I love it too much. And here is the other set I love and will not part with. I had to wait 6 months from the time I found this set at “A Well Kept Secret” in Kingston, NH, to when it went on sale almost half off. From there I talked them down another $10 while I hoped against hope someone else didn’t scoop it up! Also, because it is my favorite set 😉

Can you see why I can’t part with them? How many sets do you see like this from the 1940s that are in great shape, no cracks or chips AND together like this? You don’t — so I’m keeping them. I sell many pieces of vintage pottery in the Vintage Eve’s Etsy shop, but this set will not be one of them. Below is a cool poultry fountain by Robinson Ransbottom. They have a rich history.

rb1
Chicken Feeder Ransbottom Brothers Pottery (available at Buckeye Antiques)

Robinson Ransbottom Pottery was started in 1920 in Roseville, OH. You have to go further back to understand where they actually started, though. According to a source I go back to frequently, Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain and Clay (1988), it began further back in 1856 with Whitmore, Robinson and Company. From 1862 to 1900 this company made stoneware, yellowware, and Rockingham.

rb3
Robinson Ransbottom Pottery Brown & Teal Drip Dish (available at Sweet Karoline’s Glasses)

 

rb4
Robinson Ransbottom Mark on Dish (available at Sweet Karoline’s Glasses)

They then formed the Robinson-Merrill Company with the addition of the E.H. Merrill Company. By 1902 the company was called the Robinson Clay Products Company. Sometime during the year of 1920, the Ransbottom Brothers Pottery in Roseville, Ohio combined with Robinson Clay Products and viola Robinson-Ransbottom Pottery was born.

rb5
Robinson Ransbottom Cream Pitcher circa 1930s (available at Mulberry Pottery Antiques)

Let’s go back slightly. There were 4 Ransbottom brothers who founded a pottery in Ironspot, Ohio. They also ran a pottery in Saltillo, Ohio where they  manufactured stoneware jars. In 1910 they combined all their efforts into the Roseville plant. By 1916, the Ransbottom Brothers Pottery were the number one maker of stoneware jars in the U.S. Not too shabby!

rb6
Robinson Ransbottom Pottery Company Sailor Jack Cookie Jar circa 1940s (available at East End Antiques Co.)

The Ransbottom Brothers Pottery also made jars for preserves, churns, milk pans or bowls, poultry fountains and other utilitarian items. Many times the Robinson-Ransbottom pieces are marked just “Roseville” which causes confusion among collectors. There is a different “Roseville” that people collect and it looks different, the colors are more matte and pastel. The Ransbottom pieces are high gloss for the most part. Look at this matching piece to my beloved bowls I found for sale at Etsy! It’s a small milk pitcher.

rb8
Robinson Ransbottom Zephyr Refrigerator Pitcher (available at Nob Hill Vintage)

 

Well, Robinson Ransbottom had a nice long run, but unfortunately went out of business in 2005. And so is the history of another great company that employed hundreds of potters over the years. A number of their pieces seem to be unmarked having lost their paper stickers as time passed. I would recommend the  Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain and Clay (1988) to get a look at all the different marks they used; there are over 20. Check your library for the book or Amazon (which is where I got mine in perfectly used condition).

I hope you all have a great week! I will be partying at the link parties to the right this week. Check them out if you get the chance. And as always, leave me a note if you liked this post because I love to hear from everyone!

 

 

 

Simply Stangl

You ever buy something for someone else and then have trouble giving it away? Well, I’m having that trouble right now. I found this bowl …

c360_2016-10-08-19-05-57-979-collage-3
Stangl Blue Bowl Basin 12″

 

It’s really a basin I think, by Stangl (no “e”) Pottery. I bought it for the store but I’m having a tough time letting it go. I love the color and shape; the scroll handles and the simplicity of the design. It may stay with me awhile, but that’s ok, too.

s1
Stangl Magnolia Pattern China Warmer (available at Vintage Eve’s)
s2
Stangl Teapot circa 1950s

This is not the first piece of Stangl pottery I’ve found. I have a bit of it in the shop like these pieces above with the Magnolia pattern. I sold the teapot awhile ago. Stangl is a pottery that has been around since the late 1920s but it wasn’t until 1955 that it officially became Stangl Pottery.

s3
Stangl Gold Shell Dish (available at Liv Vintage)

Johann Martin Stangl, the founder, actually started working at Fulper pottery as a ceramic engineer in  1910. Kovels.com says that he left Fulper from 1915 to 1920 to work at Haeger pottery but returned to Fulper in 1920.

s4
Stangl Pottery Kay Hackett Design Ginger Cat (available at bopiG)

In 1926 he became president of Fulper and changed the name at that point to Stangl Pottery. But as I said above, it wasn’t officially changed until 1955. Not sure why but that’s the story!

s5
Stangl Art Vase Cornucopia (available at Yesterday and Tomorrow)

The Stangl Pottery website says that Stangl was responsible for the first “open stock solid-color dinnerware.” The original factory was located in Flemington, New Jersey with a second smaller factory built near it also in Flemington. They then acquired a larger facility that was already running in Trenton, NJ, giving them 3 working factories.

s6
Stangl Pottery Plates Tangerine, Yellow & Blue (available at Perfect Yesterdays)

Well, they did until the original Flemington factory burned, so then there were 2 factories. They didn’t bother to rebuild a third. The one in Trenton was fairly large. According to the Stangl Pottery website, the other Flemington factory then became a retail showroom during the 1930s and was not a production facility after that. It was one of the country’s first retail outlets! On a busy week, the showroom saw more than 1,000 patrons.

s7
Stangl Art Pottery Bird (available at Betsy Collection)

The company did well. Their hand-carved, hand-painted dinnerware was a favorite, as was their artware and bird figurines. They were sold in over 3,000 department stores, gift stores and more.

s8
Stangl Square Plates (available at Planet Artifact)

Stangl Pottery did well from the 1940s until the early 1970s. When Martin Stangl died in 1972 the pottery was sold to Frank Wheaton Jr., of Wheaton Industries. Kovels.com says that production continued until 1978 when Pfaltzgraff Pottery purchased the right to the Stangl trademark and all remaining inventory was liquidated.

s9
Stangl Gravy Boat in Golden Harvest (available at Matchmaker Matchmaker)

I always find it interesting to see the progression of a company and, especially in America to see how intertwined these companies all are.

s10
Stangl Leaf Dish (available at Rebekah’s Retro)

Whether I sell that lovely bowl or basin (or whatever it is), or keep it for myself, I will have owned a piece of American history. A company that lasted through the Great Depression and numerous wars through hard work and dedication to the craft of creating items that we use everyday. I just love this stuff!

I will be partying all week at the link parties on the right. Check them out – so many great blogs, so little time!! Have a great week!

 

 

Gorgeous Georges

I am always on the hunt for pieces to put in the Vintage Eve’s shop. It is rare that at least one day a week, usually Saturday, isn’t somewhat devoted to scouring thrift stores and estate sales for treasures. As you have probably noticed, I’m super drawn to mid-century modern. I love the lines and the mix of mediums used to create the look. One particular designer I’ve managed to collect a few pieces of is Georges Briard. I found another piece of his recently at the estate sale I referenced last week. I already have another one of his pieces for sale in the store. These are the two pieces.

c360_2016-09-17-17-15-23-794
Georges Briard Forbidden Fruit Pattern (available at Vintage Eve’s)
gb1
Georges Briard Relish Bowl with Attached Fork (available at Vintage Eve’s)

You can tell they are his because, well, they are signed, but also just because they look like his style as you get to know it. I was surprised to find out that Georges Briard is not his real name. His real name is Jakub Brojdo. According to Collectors Weekly he was born the Ukraine and raised in Poland.

gb2
Georges Briard Food Warmer circa 1960 (available at A Vintage Peace)

He came to the U.S. in 1937 to study at the Art Institute of Chicago. He did earn a Masters in Fine Art. He also changed his first name at that time to Jascha (Yascha) although I am not sure why. If anyone out there knows, please leave me a comment!

gb3
Green Garden Roasting Pan by Georges Briard (available at RLD Glass)

He served in the U.S. Army in WWII after which he moved to New York. Collectors Weekly says that he started painting metal serving trays and signing them Brojdo. So be on the lookout for those, they are quite a find! Because it wasn’t long after that his friend Max Wille hired him to create designs for him at the M. Wille Company. It was Max that thought up the name Georges Briard to mark his commercial pieces.  His “last name came as an inspiration at a dog show, the first was added to give continental flair” (Antique Trader).

gb4
Georges Briard Percolator (available at Sewing and Goods)

The reason for the name change is that it left his real name free for his real artwork. Georges Briard designs really caught on through the 1950s to the 1970s. He became an award-winning designer with his pieces selling in high-end department stores; Nieman Marcus, Bonwit Teller and others.

gb5
Georges Briard Lowball Glasses circa 1950s (available at Pickness)

He worked with many different glass companies, too. According to Antique Trader, he worked with Libbey and Anchor Hocking, upgrading items that would usually sell at the five and dime to then be pieces sold in Bloomingdale’s and other upscale retailers.

gb6
Georges Briard Ceramic Tray/Plate (available at Jill’s Fantastic Frills)

Some items that you can find with his designs are enameled cookware, wooden cheeseboards with tile inserts, bisque pieces, dinnerware and lamps. His designs can also be found on melamine dinnerware by Stetson.

gb7
Georges Briard Chip and Dip Set (available at Frieda’s Finds)

Brodjo received the Frank S. Child Lifetime Achievement Award given by The Society of Glass and Ceramic Decorators in 2004 to celebrate his contribution to the glass and ceramic industry. He died in New York in 2005 at the age of 88. He left a great legacy behind.

gb8
Georges Briard Melamine Plates (available at Artistic Floral Design)

That is the story of how Jakub Brodjo came to America and left his indelible mark on it as Georges Briard. It’s amazing what one can accomplish in a lifetime. I know that I love his pieces and their stylish mid-century modern aesthetic. I hope you have enjoyed reading about him and let me know if you have ever loved or found one of his pieces. Have a great week!

I will be partying this week at all the link parties on the right — check them out; all wonderful blogs!