They Named It DuraPrint

The other day in my travels, I ran across a pattern I hadn’t seen before. I was familiar with Homer Laughlin china, which I’ve actually posted about before and is archived here on the Vintage Eve’s blog. I had never seen this pattern, though. It was in their DuraPrint line. Also, new to me, as I hadn’t picked up any pieces in that line before.

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12″ Oval Platter

 

So this gorgeous pattern is called Star-Brite. If you look it up on Replacements, they list it as HLC1850 (HLC=Homer Laughlin China). It is so iconically 1950s with the black and aqua color scheme, and the atomic stars! I love it. I found two serving pieces and four dinner plates which have all since been listed in the Vintage Eve’s shop on Etsy.

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Serving Bowl

DuraPrint was a rather interesting process. According to laurelhollowpark.com, DuraPrint was a design process in the 1950s where a bladder was filled with air, and the design was basically smooshed on to a piece as the bladder was inflated. The paint was forced through holes in a thin metal plate that was attached to the bladder, which then “stamped” the piece that was being decorated (Robbinsnest). I think it lead to a number of flaws, however, as the pieces I saw had some smears and missing spots. But they were not kidding about the name.

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Up Close and Personal
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Gorgeousness

Those pieces that I put in the shop are just as bright as if they were done yesterday. After the design was put on, a clear glaze went on top. Because the design was under the glaze, they stayed looking new. Interestingly, this process only worked on the flatter pieces. Sugar bowls, creamers, etc., were one solid color with no design because they were too round to work with the DuraPrint process.

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Dinner Plates

So that’s DuraPrint. I hope you enjoyed this short look at an old process. I do love old china and dishware, especially the bowls — you know I do! Have a great week everyone!

 

References:

Laurel Hollow Park. (n.d.). Charm House and Duraprint. Retrieved from http://www.laurelhollowpark.net/hlc/charmhouse.html

Robbins Nest. (n.d.). Duraprint. Retrieved from https://www.robbinsnest.com/china/homer-laughlin-china/duraprint/

 

Noritake From the Beginning

I hope you have been enjoying this summer. Well, here it is summer. It’s been very hot and humid this year in southern New Hampshire, but life is good. Since we only really have three or four months of warm weather, I’ll take it!

As always, I have been on the hunt for new things to add to the Vintage Eve’s shop this summer. I’ve come across some nice pieces, too! I am definitely drawn to fine china. It’s part of my obsession with vintage kitchen stuff (as if you couldn’t tell from reading this blog), but that’s why I have the shop — to support my habit, which in turn allows me to buy more. It’s a circle.

I happen to have a few pieces by Noritake and I was wondering the other day how long they have been in business. So, here we go.

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Noritake Vegetable Serving Bowl in Pasadena Pattern circa 1960s

Noritake started as a trading company in 1876. According to Noritakechina.com it was the baby of the Morimura brothers. Ichizaemon Morimura decided to open an export business, mainly to keep money flowing into his country, and he sent his brother, Toyo, to New York to open Morimura Brothers, an import business. Very smart really. Morimura Brothers imported china and other items for sale in the U.S., exported by the other brother, Ichizaemon (Noritake.co.jp).

In Noritake, a small suburb of Nagoya, Japan, a factory was created in 1904, particularly to create fine porcelain dinnerware to export to the United States. It didn’t happen until 1914, though, that they were able to accomplish this feat. There was a lot of trial and error to get a dinnerware line that could be exported.

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Noritake Cho Cho San Gravy Boat circa 1950s

Most of their designs were hand-painted in the beginning with a liberal addition of gold embellishment. As they grew, they perfected their manufacturing techniques and Noritake took off. Noritake china is now sold world-wide. Originally, the brand was called “Nippon Toki Gomei Kaisha,” which eventually became Noritake Company, Limited.

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Flat Boullion Cups Rochambeau Pattern circa 1920s

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Their backstamps, or porcelain marks, vary greatly. The earliest one is a circle with a “Maruki Mark,” dating to 1902. There is also a “Royal Sometuke NIPPON” mark that dates to 1906. One registered mark in 1908 is an “RC” underlined over a fulcrum with “Noritake” underneath. There is an extensive list of marks with pictures at http://www.noritakecollectorsguild.info/bstamps/. Check them out.

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Noritake Cho Cho San Trio circa 1950s

It was very interesting that two brothers started this company, and that it is still in business. The company managed to diversify into many different fields, which served them well. Along with fine china, the company currently creates grinding wheels for various industries, their printing and color mixing techniques are used in technology, including automobiles, and their engineering techniques are used in yet other areas of industry. They survived during the Occupation years after WWII, and continued to create and diversify into present day.

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Noritake Fine China Back Stamp circa 1950s

I hope you enjoyed learning about this company with its rich history. Japan itself is a beautiful country. My daughter recently returned from a school trip there, and her pictures are amazing.

I hope that you enjoy the rest of your summer (if it’s summer where you are!). I will enjoy the roughly 60 days before it turns colder here, although, I’m more a fan of Autumn in New Hampshire, anyway. If you’ve never experienced a Fall in New Hampshire, with the burst of oranges, golds, and reds, it’s amazing, and only lasts a month, maybe a month and a half if you’re lucky. I’m hoping for a long Autumn before the snow flies. Have a great week!

 

Honorable Mentionables

There’s been a number of new things added to the shop recently. As you know by now if you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, I like to find the backstories and histories on my pieces. However, now and again, there just isn’t much information on a company or a piece. That doesn’t mean that they don’t deserve a mention! So here are some honorable mentionables.

Take a look at this gorgeous copper bowl!

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Copper Bowl with Silver Wash by Peter Manzoni Boston Metalworker circa 1930
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Signature of Artist

I’ve had this beautiful copper bowl for a bit in the store, however, there is very little information about the maker. Peter Manzoni was a metal worker back in the 1920s in Boston, Massachusetts. The bowl is beautiful, shaped like a flower with a gorgeous silver wash that complements the copper and the shape. It’s small, at only about 4 1/2″ across, but it’s got style for miles. It’s signed on the bottom, and is one of his better known shapes.

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Side View of Manzoni Bowl

All I can find out about him, though, is that he was part of the Boston Arts and Crafts Movement. He was a metalworker who also contributed to a book called “Metalwork for the Amateur” in 1936. He also partnered later with Angelo Martini to form Manzoni and Martini Art Metal Company. That’s about what I know of this amazing metal worker. If anyone has anymore information, please share in the comments! 

Here’s another one …

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Dru Holland Enameled Cast Iron Au Gratin Casserole Dish circa 1960s

This is a Dru Holland single casserole baking dish. Dru was a popular company during the 1960s due to a resurgence in enameled cast iron. This stuff is durable, although prone to chipping. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot about the company that I can find. Most of their stuff that I’ve found is either light blue or mint green with these tulip designs or other flowers. It was made from the 1930s to the 1960s. Love the look.

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Dru Holland Blue Tulip

 

 

Finally, there’s this adorably round pitcher

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Danish Modern Queens Art Pewter Pitcher with Rattan Wrapped Handle circa 1960s

It was made by Queens Art Pewter. The company was in business from the 1930s to the early 2000s. I know that the “Queens” part of their name comes from Queens, New York, which is where they were based, and that 80% of their products were pewter. They also had a silver line. But that is all I’ve been able to glean about them.

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Maker’s Mark
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Rattan Wrapped Handle

 

So there are three pieces that I have in the Vintage Eve’s shop that are really cool, but that I can’t seem to find much information on, one way or the other. If any of you have  information on any of these pieces, please share in the comments! I love to hear from you.

I hope you have enjoyed this quick peek today. Have a great week!

 

A Toast to Toast Racks

I recently added to the Vintage Eve’s shop, and quickly sold, a lovely little silver-plated toast rack. In researching how to price it, I saw so many pretty toast racks it made me wonder how far back these go? Also, when did they actually start making toast? So of course that led me to when did they decide they needed a rack to stand them up and why?

Here is a picture of the toast rack that started this short jaunt.

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William Hutton & Sons Toast Rack 1930s

The top is a little squished, but it is almost 100-years old, and one must forgive some flaws in a piece that old. Here’s a unique one in Lusterware from the 40s.

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1940s Lusterware Toast Rack (available at Tiny China Vintage)

According to a New York Times article, toast has been around for awhile. It comes from the Latin “Torrere” which means “to burn.” While burnt toast isn’t the ideal, they actually originally used toast to flavor alcohol. They usually used stale bread that would hold up to toasting in the fire. They had toasting forks so they could hold the toast in the fire until it was just the right color.

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James Deakin Toast Rack 1900s Art Nouveau (available at Vintage and Deco)

The first toast racks seem to have come into existence sometime in the late 1700s, that comes from a mix of different sources. They all seem to agree that the 1770s is about the right time. They were simple devices at the beginning, just wire soldered to a tray type of thing. They got more elaborate as people started using them.

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James Dixon Toast Rack 1910s (available at Museography)

They were used because it kept the toast from getting soggy and the crumbs would get caught in the tray, keeping everything neat and tidy. There are some really wonderful examples of toast racks out there.

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Edwardian Era Toast Rack (available at White Hart Antiques)

People tend to use these as letter holders these days, or they did until email took the place of snail mail. Time marches on, you know. I’m sure we’ll find another use for these. Maybe we might even go back to using them for toast!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this foray into toast racks. Enjoy your week!

 

What’s Cooking?

One of the things I love to find while I’m out and about are vintage cookbooks for a couple of reasons. One being that they sell well in my Etsy shop, the other is that I love thumbing through these vintage books looking at pictures from my childhood and before. Take a look at this one I found recently which I adore.

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Famous Eating Places
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Those graphics!!!!

It’s actually a cross-collectible for those that collect automobile memorabilia since it was put out by the Ford and Lincoln-Mercury Dealerships back in 1954. I love that there are 4 recipes from my state and many more from all over the United States. One of the restaurants is still standing in Portsmouth, NH, but is not a restaurant anymore, it’s a business. Time marches on.

Here is another one that I really like.

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Betty Crocker helps you with all your hostess needs!

These Betty Crocker books have great pictures and recipes. Look at that spread!

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Here is another from Betty.

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Not sure what that white ring is but I’m all in for that fondue!!

I especially like cookbooks from the 1950s and 1960s. And if you’ve read my many blog entries, you know I love Mid-Century stuff. And that includes cookbooks.

Although, here’s an oldy. A reproduction from the early Williamsburg days.

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Close up!

Obviously, people have been writing down recipes for a long time. Did you know that the oldest recipes ever found were written on clay tablets? Called the Yale Culinary Tablets, they date back to 1700 B.C. They only list the ingredients though and not the directions (Yale Tablets). It was sort of a crap shoot I guess if you got it right. Click the link for more info.

Here’s one that is relevant for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday!

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Who knew the cranberry was so versatile!
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Free Recipes!

Does anyone remember the Galloping Gourmet? I remember my dad watching this show on Saturday afternoons.

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There he is! Not my dad, the Galloping Gourmet!

There are so many different kinds of cookbooks. One that recently sold in the shop was from the 1960s that was a compilation of Boston Globe recipes. I almost didn’t let that one go. One that I am keeping for now because I need more time to explore it is this one.

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Anyone need a recipe for a Teen-Age Square Dance?! Here’s one!

I like the way it reads like a story and I want to try some of the recipes. This one is interesting in that it was written in 1959 and it has a section on cooking for food allergies and another section warning about fad diets. I didn’t think they knew about those issues back then! So I’ll hang on to this one.

Well, I thank you for taking the time to enjoy these great vintage cookbooks with me. Most of them (not all) are available in the Vintage Eve’s shop on Etsy. As always, have a wonderful day and maybe try a new (old) recipe!! If you do, drop me a line and let me know what you made. Always looking for something different to answer that age-old question … what’s for dinner?! My kids don’t even have to wait til I get home to ask anymore, they text me that question now. Time does indeed march on but the question remains the same. Have a great week!

 

Lovely Old (and sold) Things

I thought it would be interesting to look at some lovely old things that have passed through my store in the last month or so. They are a mix of vintage items that I really couldn’t dig up a lot about so I thought I’d make one post out of 5 of them.

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Rumpp Shot Glasses with Leather Case 1940s

I loved these old shot glasses from the 1940s. Let me tell you, they weren’t in the shop long before they sold! They were produced by a company named Rumpp. The 4 shot glasses are silver-plated and fit snugly in their soft leather case with a snap. The bottom of the glasses say “Made in Germany U.S. Zone.” I’d never seen that mark before. My research says this mark was used between the years of 1945 to 1950.

C.F. Rumpp & Sons was a leather manufacturer that was open from the mid-1800s to 1959. It closed in 1959 and was demolished in 1965. They were well-known while they were around.

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1930s Children’s Puzzle by Tudor Press

This little puzzle wasn’t in the shop long either! By Tudor Press, it was from the 1930s and had Porky Pig and Puppy Sam. I thought it interesting that Porky Pig was named on the puzzle. The bow-tie-wearing pig I remember from the cartoons looks nothing like this but they appeared around the same time in the 1930s.

 

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Dru Enameled Cast Iron Butter Warmer Mid-Century Modern

 

As I’ve mentioned many times, I’m a huge fan of Mid-Century Modern. This little piece is enameled cast iron by a company called Dru Holland. It’s a small trivet that goes with the butter warmer by the same company, and in the same pattern. There is little to no information about the company online. They were in business during the 1960s; out of business by the 1970s. That’s about all I know of the company, but their stuff is classic Mid-Mod.

 

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Ned Smith Highball Glasses Signed

These are highball glasses all signed by an artist by the name of Ned Smith. He was a painter born in 1919 who became a nature artist. He was known for his very detailed and accurate drawings of wildlife for books and magazines. There is a website with a short biography about him at the Ned Smith Center. He died in 1985. I’m not sure exactly when these glasses were commissioned. I can tell you they didn’t stay long in the shop!

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Covered Casserole by Sadek from the 1970s Oven to Table Cookware

Lastly, there is this lovely lady. This piece is from the 1970s, a covered casserole dish with vibrant flowers. I love the shape of the handles. The Sadek Company was founded in 1936 by Charles and Norman Sadek. The Andrea line was named after Charles’ granddaughter and is still in production.

I love the pieces that I sell, that’s why I sell vintage. Each one has it’s own little history. I may not always be able to find more than a paragraph, or an entry at a licence or patent site, but each piece has an origin. If they could only talk … okay, seriously that would creep me out, but it would definitely be interesting!

I hope you have enjoyed a look at some lovely old pieces and their brief histories. Thank you for sharing your time with me and have a great week!

Get the Brush!

A few months back, I did a post on McCoy Pottery which talked about the Nelson McCoy connection. That post touched briefly on George Brush who had gone into business with Nelson McCoy, forming Brush-McCoy. This union only lasted until 1918 when they went their separate ways and Brush Pottery became its own business. The Brush-McCoy mark stopped being used in 1925.

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Brush Pottery Planter in Brown Drip (available at Vintage Eve’s)

According to Lehner’s Encyclopedia, there are 2 different Brush Potteries. The first one was only in business for a year (1907 to 1908) when the pottery burned down. In that year they produced kitchen ware and sanitary ware. One item of note was the Lucille Toilet Ware line.  After the fire destroyed the 1-kiln plant, George Brush, the owner, went to McCoy Pottery. The original Brush pottery used the old Union Pottery molds so I’m not sure how to identify those pieces. If anyone knows, let me know!

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Lucille Toilet Ware (credit BWPOSECC Stoneware)

On to the second Brush Pottery.  Once Brush and McCoy went their separate ways with McCoy selling their interest in Brush-McCoy, Brush started turning out many well vitrified products. Lehner’s Encyclopedia lists those items as kitchen ware, vases, cookie jars, patio ware, garden ware and more. Their cookie jars are very collectible and they had quite a few designs.

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Happy Bunny – Chef Bunny Brush Pottery Cookie Jar (available at Just About Modern)

During the 1920s through the 1940s, they updated their equipment, getting a new tunnel kiln which improved their production. They introduced their Colonial Mat and Art Vellum lines; going towards softer and semi-matte finishes. According to the American Association of Art Pottery some of their brightly colored glazes sold really well, too, in the 1930s. They had a faux Rockingham Nurock glaze that was popular during this time.

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Brush Pottery Art Vellum Glazed Vase circa 1930s (available at Delovelyness)

Brush Pottery is remembered for a few key pieces, mainly frogs of every shape and attitude, as well as cookie jars. And to combine those two, a frog cookie jar called “Hill Billy Frog” which is rare and can sell upwards of $4,000! Their main business turned more towards the floral and novelty. Just like the planter at the top from the Vintage Eve’s shop and this one here.

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Brush Pottery Planter (available at Junctique)

 

Here is the “Hill Billy Frog” cookie jar. The link will take you to a website to help you know the difference between the original and the repro.

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Brush Pottery Hill Billy Frog Cookie Jar Real and Repro

You will still see a lot of items listed as “Brush McCoy” when you shop even if they are just marked “Brush.” Anything produced after 1925 is either a McCoy or a Brush, not the combined name. Also, the Brush name was always impressed into the clay. The new repros out there have “Brush McCoy” in raised letters. In December 1978, Brush Pottery was sold to C.S.C. Inc. of Chicago, then in 1979 to Virgil Cole and John O. Everhart. They closed for good in 1982.

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Brush Pottery Frog (available at NLDVintage)

They were around from the 1920s through to the 1980s. I can’t find the information as to what finally shut them down. They may have gone the same way many of the others did, with cheap imports taking over the market or it could have been lack of interest of the new owners. Hard to say. But it closed down in 1982 and burned down sometime around the turn of this century.

Again, I find it interesting to untangle the threads of all these companies, to follow one to its roots. I hope you have enjoyed this post and will join me at the link parties on the right. Have a great week!

 

 

Raise the Anchor

I have been away for a bit from the blog due to a very hectic schedule over the last few months! In my other life, I am a Special Ed Teacher and as such, the last few months before school ends are rounds of grading papers, meetings, testing and taking advantage of the good weather if at all possible! But here we are, together again, and I’d like to touch on a company that we have probably all invited into our houses at one point or another.

Anchor Hocking. This company has been around more than a century in many different forms. We’ve all seen their stuff. I have a couple of their pieces in the shop currently. Like these ones.

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Anchor Hocking Relish Dish (available at Vintage Eve’s)
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Anchor Hocking Moonstone Hobnail Divided Dish (available at Vintage Eve’s)

They originally started as the Hocking Company back in 1905 near the Hocking River — hence the name. At the time, according to the Anchor Hocking Museum website (AH), Isaac J. Collins and 6 of his friends had raised about $8,000 to buy Lancaster Carbon Company when they went into receivership. Even back then, though, $8k was not enough and they needed to bring on one more investor by the name of Mr. E.B. Good. He gave them another $17,000 which sealed the deal and Mr. Collins had himself a glass factory.

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Hocking Glass Co. Elegant Glass Pink Mayfair (available at I Do Pink)

During their first year in business, with 50 employees, Hocking Glass Company sold about $20,000 worth of glassware. Not too shabby! As they expanded they began to sell some stock in the company.

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Ruby Red Berry Bowl Coronation Banded (available at Vintage Creative Accen)

They were going along pretty good until there was a huge fire which destroyed their main facility. How many times have we seen this played out with some of these early 20th century companies?! They worked it out, though because out of those ashes rose a new facility called Plant 1 — specifically designed to produce glassware. The one that burned down had originally been a carbon company when they bought the facility.

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Hocking Glass Co. Yellow Cameo Open Sugar (available at Places to Put Things)

Hocking Glass began buying up some other companies such as the Lancaster Glass Company (Plant 2) and the Standard Glass Manufacturing Company. This was all during the 1920s. Just before the Great Depression hit, they developed a revolutionary machine that pressed glass automatically. It allowed them to make over 30 items per minute, whereas before they could only make 1 per minute.

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Anchor Hocking Fire King Bowls with Handles (Treasure Evermore)

Once that was perfected, they then created a machine with 15 molds that could turn out 90 pieces of glass per minute! That allowed them to lower their costs considerably. During the Depression they were able to sell tumblers “two for a nickel” and still stay in business.

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Anchor Hocking Berwick Boopie Sherbert circa 1950 (available at Red River Antiques)

In 1931 they purchased a 50% share of the General Glass Company which was in the process of acquiring Turner Glass Company of Winchester, Indiana. The information on the Anchor Hocking Museum website (AH) says that this merger is what ended up creating the Anchor Hocking name. What happened was that Hocking Glass and the companies it was now merged with developed the first one-way beer bottle. Before that, beer was sold in refillable bottles.

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Anchor Hocking Maxwell House Pressed Glass Jar (available at The Jelly Jar)

On December 31, 1937, Anchor Cap and Closure and all its subsidiaries merged with Hocking Glass. They had closure plants all over the Eastern seaboard and in Canada. They also had glass container plants in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. This led the now Anchor-Hocking Glass Company into glassware, containers and then into tableware, toiletries, cosmetic containers, and more.

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Anchor Hocking Milk Glass Mugs (available at The Discerning Hoarder)

They continued to expand through the next decades. In 1969 they dropped the “Glass” part of their name because they were so far beyond just producing glass. Actually during the prior year, 1968, they had entered the plastics market after their acquisition of Plastics Incorporated.

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Plastic Anchor Hocking Cups for the 1984 Olympics (available at Luxurys Warehouse)

In 1970 they purchased Phoenix Glass Company in Pennsylvania and entered the lighting field. They also bought Taylor, Smith & Taylor putting them squarely into the earthenware, fine stoneware, and institutional china dinnerware business.

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Anchor Hocking Hobnail Perfume Bottle (available at MidCenturyMad Shop)

Over the years they have bought and sold different divisions. You can go to the Anchor Hocking Museum website (AH) for a very detailed listing of all the subsidiaries and divisions that have been acquired, merged, or sold. The list gets complicated. In 2006 Anchor-Hocking filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection due to heavier than expected losses. They were bought by Oneida which in turn was acquired by EverywhereWare, Inc. So they are still in business under the Anchor-Hocking name.

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Mid-Century Ice Bucket Anchor Hocking (available at Gentry Antiques)

They apparently only used 3 marks during their production years. There is a mark that has an “HG” over “Co.” which was used from 1905 to 1937. The anchor with an H in the middle used from 1937 to 1968. Finally, the anchor inside a square used from 1968 until now.

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Anchor Hocking Ruby Glass Pitcher (available at Heather’s Collectibles)

It is amazing how intertwined so many of these companies became. It is like trying to unravel a knotted ball of yarn; they start out simple and then it’s almost impossible to separate one from the other. It’s all interesting though!

I hope you have enjoyed this week’s post. Please join me at the link parties on the right — lots of wonderful blogs — and have a great week!!

 

 

 

A Federal Case

I’ve been adding a lot of glassware recently to the Vintage Eve’s shop when I realized I never did a post on Federal Glass. I did touch on it briefly in my post about Depression Glass but it deserves a post of its own.

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Federal Glass Depression Glass in Sharon Pattern (available at Vintage Eve’s)

In 1900, George and Robert J. Beatty, who came from a successful glass-making family, banded together with some other glass makers to start Federal Glass in Columbus, Ohio. At that time, they were only making tumblers and jellies.

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Federal Glass “Jack Frost” Tumbler (available at Straits Antiques)

By 1906 they had expanded their line to include bottles and jars. Mostly utilitarian stuff which was common around this time in a number of glass houses. By 1914 they were making some pressed glass pieces. According to the Glass Encyclopedia, many of their designs were from molds acquired from other companies.

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Federal Glass Salt and Pepper Madrid Pattern (available at MilkWhite)

They used a lot of designs that originated with US Glass Company such as “Peacock Feather,” “Kansas,” and “Caledonia” all of which were made originally by US Glass. Their glassware was still clear flint glass at this point, they hadn’t made any colored glass. Some other companies were using the same patterns as Federal during this time, too, which can be slightly confusing.

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Sugar in Peacock Feather (available at Cherished Tidbits)

Around 1913, old catalogs show that they were also making items for groceries such as salt, pepper and spice shakers. They also made measuring jugs and other items. I was not able to track down a picture of the catalog but it’s out there somewhere.

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Covered Candy Dish in Diana Pattern by Federal Glass (available at Lubie’s Vintage Finds)

During the early years they were plagued with union strikes from the flint workers. One strike lasted almost 2 years. They tried to keep their shop non-union while paying their workers more than most people in the business (www.FOHBC.org).

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Federal Glass Refrigerator Dishes (available at Viewridge Vintage)

During the 1920s they continued to expand their lines into full tableware sets, colored glass, and more. By the 1920s and 1930s they were creating some patterns in Depression Glass that are looked for by collectors today. Some of those patterns are “Diana (1937-1941),” “Mayfair (1934),” “Parrot (1931-1932),” “Sharon,” and a number of others. One of their more popular designs in 1940s was the “Park Avenue.”

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Federal Glass Horse-Head Book Ends (available at Red River Antiques)

Around 1927 the Federal Glass mark started being used in catalogs. It is an “F” inside a shield. The mark itself was not registered until 1944.

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Federal Glass Petal Serving Dish with Holder and Spoon (available at Grandes Treasures)

From what I uncovered in my research, Federal Glass Company was good to its employees. When their employees returned from WWII, they were given back their jobs or received better ones, and they closed for a day to honor those who had died in the war.

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Federal Glass Covered Casserole Dishes Sunflower Pattern (available at Elementree Old Skool)

In 1949, Corning Glass Works sued Federal saying they had infringed on 2 of their patents. Both patents were related to heat-treated glass they used in their tumblers under the “STURDEE” name. It took 6 years to bring to trial and was dismissed as unfounded in 1956. Then there was a company named “Federal Glass Company” in Dover, Delaware that Federal Glass sued asking them to stop using the “Federal” name. The Ohio Federal Glass won and was awarded the right to rename the Delaware company (www.FOHBC.org).

They were quite prosperous through the 1950s and 1960s. So why did they go out of business? One reason, according to FOHBC, is that a lot of their business was wrapped up in premiums that gas stations gave away. When the gas shortages hit in the early 1970s, their business took a $5 million hit. Then the Federal Paper Board, with whom they had merged in 1957, decided to sell the glass division to Lancaster Colony. That sale didn’t go through.

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Federal Glass Patio Snack Set (available at Ruby Blue Lane)

After a lot of back and forth, Lancaster tried again but wanted the right to reduce wages and remove pensions. The results were that in 1979 they ceased making glass. FOHBC goes into a lot more detail on what caused the complete collapse such as the wide-spread use of plastics and more. They had made it through the Great Depression but after 79 years in business, the doors closed.

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Federal Glass Sugar and Creamer in Normandie Pattern Amber (available at CrochetNCollectibles)

Well, that is a quick look at the Federal Glass Company. They made some great and enduring pieces that we still love today. I hope you enjoyed reading and remember to join me at the link parties on the right this week! Have a great week!

 

Kitties and Pixies

Oh my! It has been a whirlwind month! An exchange student from Japan came to our home and for two and a half weeks, shared her culture with us as we shared ours. It was an experience that I know our family will never forget. It was an awesome 2 1/2 weeks and I was surprised how much we missed her when she left. I say all of this to explain my absence for the last few weeks. Along with other obligations the blog has been a little neglected!

But here we are, together again and I would like to take a look at a prolific importer and designer of the mid-century, Holt-Howard. Their designs, like these cat S&P shakers, started off my small S&P collection. Here are the cats …

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Holt Howard Cozy Cats S&P

And some more of my collection. These are not for sale in the shop, because I love them too much!

The cats actually have a meowing canister in them so when you turn them upside down they meow. They don’t meow anymore, but they would have back in the day. Holt-Howard imported, designed and sold a lot of these cute items using cats, pixies and other animals. They started back in 1949 when John and Robert Howard and Grant Holt started the company.

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Cocktail Mice by Holt Howard circa 1960s (available at The Log Chateau)

According to Kovels the company started selling Christmas items made and sold in the U.S. Holt-Howard was originally based in New York City and moved to Stamford, Connecticut in 1955. Over the years they were sold a couple of times before closing in the 1990s. During their heyday, though, they produced different lines that are well-known in the vintage world.

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1958 Holt Howard Christmas Planter (available at Vintage Quality Finds)

 

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Double Taper Holder Holt Howard (available at Burst of Bambino)

As I said, they started with U.S. made goods but soon turned to overseas manufacturing to keep costs low. Some of their U.S. made Christmas stuff included the winking Santa and Merry Whiskers beverage sets.

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Holt Howard Merry Whiskers (available at The Pokey Poodle)

As their manufacturing moved overseas, they began to produce sort of cartoon type figures made into useful kitchen/household items. One of their lines was Pixieware. These are brightly colored kitchen items like the ones below.

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Holt Howard Pixieware Jam’n Jelly Jars with Spoons (available at House of Alexie)

This line was produced from about 1958 to the early 1960s. Many of the condiment jars are pretty easy to find but some of them are rarer than others. Those ones are the honey or chili sauce jars and there is also one for instant coffee (ahh can’t you just smell the Sanka!).

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Rare Liquor Decanter (available at My Daughters Matter)
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Rare Chili Sauce Pixieware by Holt Howard (available at My Daughters Matter)

The Pixieware line also included Spoofy Spoons, liquor decanters, salt and pepper sets, teapots and more. Another line was the Cozy Cats and Kittens line. That’s where my S&P shakers come in. In this line there were all sorts of things from string holders to ashtrays, spice sets and grease crocks.

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Holt Howard Cozy Kitten Cottage Cheese Container (available at Paul’s Retro Lounge)

They also produced the Exotic Rooster Line. I personally love roosters and during the 50’s and 60s they were very popular for decoration. Holt-Howard’s Red Rooster Coq Rouge dinnerware line, introduced in the 1960s, was designed by Bob Howard. This line was carried through the 1970s in finer department stores.

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Holt Howard Rooster S&P (available at So Fresh So Vintage)

Holt-Howard was copied by any number of copy cats. ThoughtCo., another blog, has a list of these copy cats and how to tell the difference between the knock offs and the real HH.

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Holt Howard Trivet in Coq Rouge Pattern (available at Rediscovered Retro)

As the years wore on, Holt-Howard was bought by General Housewares Corporation in 1968. By 1974 the Howard brothers and Holt had left to follow other dreams. The company was then again sold to Kay Dee Designs of Rhode Island in 1990. In fact Grant Holt and John Howard formed another company called Grant-Howard Associates which produced Pixieware pieces but nothing from the original Holt-Howard Pixieware line.

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Holt Howard Instant Coffee Jar (available at Mary’s Business)

I love the Holt-Howard pieces myself. Whimsical and fun but with a definite mid-century look. The pieces today just don’t capture the same look. Well, I hope you have enjoyed this post. Have a great week and look for me at the link parties on the right all week!